All Posts (18253)

A computer software engineer by day, Takashi Kitajima hits the streets of Tokyo after work hours, armed with his camera and a vision of the city as a dreamy wonderland. Through his lens, the bustling metropolis melts away into colorful layers of creamy bokeh that are stunning to behold.

From vantage points high and low, Kitajima transforms glittering night scenes into abstract images that depict the cityscape in a new light. Distinct objects like the Tokyo Tower, high-rises, and old temples serve as the clear focal points around which multihued bokeh swirl. The photographer's snapshots are a spectacularly beautiful take on Tokyo as a dazzling world of color and radiance.…

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Lately, we've seen a rise in wedding photos that have a beautifully artistic feeling. Double exposures (or multiple exposures) have become a hot trend, as both wedding publication The Knot and blog Bridal Musings have stated. In PDN's newest photo contest, called Top Knots, you can also see a few examples of this. While we've seen this photo technique used many times before, this is the first time we're rounding up some examples of double exposures taken from the wedding photography community.

While double exposures can be created in camera, with no post…

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Polish parents Ania Waluda and Michal Zawer are both photographers. So, when it came to newborn photos of their daughter Emilia, they decided to get creative. They captured these whimsical images featuring Zawer and his little girl, and it appears as though she’s magically floating in mid-air. This isn’t the work of photo manipulation, either. The charming pictures were all produced without the use of Photoshop.

So, how’d they do it? It’s all about vantage point. The couple laid baby Emilia on a mattress with her father and various small props. Waluda then snapped the photos from above (taking breaks when their daughter fell asleep). They did a great job of creating the illusion - the white edge of the mattress resembles a floor’s baseboard while the cushion looks like a piece of textured drywall.

"The main idea behind this photo shoot was our daughter's safety,"…

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As Bigfoot believers might tell you, you’ll never know when the elusive cryptid will show up. It could even be in something like a baked good! Food writer Jenn Fujikawa created a Bigfoot Bundt Cake tutorial that features Sasquatch hidden beneath the surface. At first glance, it looks like your average sweet treat, but once it’s sliced open, the cake reveals an awesome surprise.

To replicate this effect, you first use a Bigfoot cookie cutter and extract its shape from a pre-made chocolate cake. Afterwards, combine ingredients like flour, sugar, and buttermilk to whip up the batter for a vanilla cake. Half of the mixture is poured into the pan and the Yetis are placed on top (turned upside down). They’re then covered with the remaining batter and baked, which will later display a delicious secret.

The cookie cutter is styled after Bigfoot from an iconic…

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The winners of the 2015 Underwater Photography Contest hosted by the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science have just been announced! Since the contest's inception in 2005, each year the school invites amateur photographers from around the world to submit their best underwater images in the categories macro, fish or marine animal portraiture, wide angle, and student submissions.

This year, Andrey Shpatak took home the top prize out of over 500 entries for his stunning capture of a Japanese War Bonnet in Rudnaya Bay. The spectacular-looking fish, whose tendril-like cirri are said to resemble the feathers in an Indian Chieftain’s war bonnet, stares unblinkingly forward in this magnificent images.

Check out the other award-winning photos below!

Above: Best…
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Electrical engineer Mervyn O'Gorman captured these beautifully vibrant photos of his daughter Christina at Lulworth Cove in Dorset, England in 1913. The century-old photos depict Christina wearing vivid red clothes, the saturated hues standing out in sharp contrast to the muted tones of the background. Long exposure times and wider apertures create a shallow depth of field, giving the images a soft, dreamlike quality. Timeless in appearance, the gorgeous shots look like they could've been captured during any era, from the days before World War I to this contemporary age.

O'Gorman achieved the lovely colors through the Autochrome Lumière process, a technique that used glass plates coated in potato starches to filter pictures with dye. His remaining images are regularly featured in exhibitions of early color photos from over a century ago. Although O'Gorman…

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When Apollo Bergeron was diagnosed with a rare heart defect, he underwent two heart surgeries and was left with a feeding tube in his stomach. Despite his physical limitations, his mom Renee did not want her youngest son to view himself as less than other children, so she decided to dress him up as a superhero. 

Since the compassionate mom is also a professional photographer, she captured various encouraging snapshots of her son as a superhero and was then inspired to keep going with this theme. "I am a professional photographer, so when I saw how much he loved the photos, I decided to start doing this for other families of children with special needs," Renee told …

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A Taiwanese pet grooming salon has taken dog hairstyles to a whole new level. In order to make their furry friends stand out on social media, eager pet owners collaborated with pet groomers to give their dogs impeccable square-shaped haircuts. It definitely takes a certain breed of dog to successfully pull off this look, especially since the pup would need to have long facial hair for this shapely style. It certainly is an eye-catching trend!

via [RocketNews24]…

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This new wetsuit will have men everywhere surfing in style! Quicksilver Japan recently announced the release of True Wetsuits, a high quality wetsuit that you can wear both in the boardroom and at the beach. While the suit jacket and pants are made of stretchy neoprene, the shirt is made with Dryflight, a water repellent fabric developed by Quiksilver and 3M. It comes in black or navy (business and surfing) and also tuxedo (party and surfing). Made to order, each suit retails for 300,000 yen (or about $2,500 US dollars) and ships in approximately two months.

Quiksilver created this stylish wetsuit because they felt as though the modern businessperson leads too busy of a lifestyle to find time to surf. While once can't imagine a person really wearing this wetsuit at the office, we'd most definitely crack a smile if we saw someone sporting this while…

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If you’re walking along the streets of cities like Paris, Barcelona, and Portland, you might come across the Outings project. It’s a worldwide participative event that was initiated by French artist and filmmaker Julien de Casabianaca. People around the globe install obscure figures seen in historical paintings as street art. These subjects now occupy bricks and concrete rather than carefully-prepared canvases. They live among graffitied walls and gaze at passersby, bringing beauty to unexpected places.

Outings began last August after Casabianca visited the Louvre and discovered a bored-looking girl in the corner of a painting. “I had a ‘Prince Charming’ impulse,” he explained to Slate. “I wanted to free her from the…

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If you enjoy food and organization, then you’ll love photographer Brittany Wright. Her Instagram account, @wrightkitchen, is full of visually-pleasing images of vibrantly-hued food that’s meticulously arranged. Fruits, vegetables, and even burnt toast look appetizing as they’re organized according to color and shape. This creates a beautiful gradient effect that effortlessly moves our eye through her compositions. It also highlights just how much variation there is in something like a tomato or pepper.

Wright says that her life goal is to teach herself how to cook everything and anything. She sees food as an art, which is evident through her creative photos. Sometimes, she’ll mix halved pieces with whole ones, or different-yet-similar colored fruits and vegetables. It’s as if she’s…

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A New Jersey homeowner was fortunate enough to find a delightfully cute surprise in his backyard—a litter of baby foxes! Philip Wang and his daughter Alice discovered the little kits on their 7-acre property in Princeton, NJ. The pair photographed the adorable foxes as they dozed together, played with each other, explored their surroundings, and even turned their curious eyes upon the camera.

"I see red foxes a few times a year, so I know we have foxes around," Philip told Philly.com, "but last week I heard like a soft 'meowing' like a cat near a shed. And then I saw that they were very young foxes and started taking their pictures everyday. And they are very, very cute."

Luckily, Mama Fox came back later with dinner, making sure that her babies were safe and…

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Brooklyn-based artist Dennis McNett carves into large pieces of wood and transforms their surfaces into energetic characters and dynamic ocean waves. His colorful works sometimes combine two creatures - like wolves and snakes - and the results are incredibly imaginative and often fierce looking. McNett depicts the sharp teeth of a leopard in minute, impressive detail.

These unique pieces are hand carved, and they start with McNett drawing the design directly onto the wood. Then, using tools like a gouge, he cuts into the surface and creates patterns that mimic fur, waves, and the veins on leaves. Everything is painted once the carving is done. McNett adds bold colors and eye-catching black outlines to stylize his works and give them a fantastical, cartoonish feel.

As a child, McNett was encouraged in art making. His blind grandfather repeatedly told him that his drawings were…

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Using a completely blank canvas, painter Adam S. Doyle has the innate ability to create magical, lifelike images. With the use of simplified, visible brushstrokes, Doyle organically paints vivid creatures such as howling wolves, birds in flight, and stoic foxes. Each captivating monochromatic subject is designed without initial planning or sketching. Instead, the incredible painter allows his work to happen naturally, evolving from the moment his paintbrush touches down upon his canvas. 

Most importantly, Doyle sees his artwork as a form of storytelling, making a point to breathe life into his subjects. "My work always begins with a love for the magic of creation – the blank surface transformed into a living thing or another world. This act has been with…

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Maude White snips away tiny bits of paper to reveal incredibly intricate scenes. The artist, based in Buffalo, New York, brings imaginative animals and fanciful panoramas to life with her lacy, hand-cut designs. She calls her technique “paper carving.” Most of her creations are cut from plain white paper in crisp simplicity, but she also crafted a handful of projects from faded road maps. From her lacy delicate pages, birds spread their wings, elephants dance, and dragons rear to life.

White says that since she was a child, she has been looking for hidden beauty in unexpected places.  “I was always looking underneath objects, or through them,” she says on her website. “I have always believed that if you look hard enough, you will see something precious and new, or, perhaps, something incredibly ancient and sacred.” White found that the perfect medium for conveying these…

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Ellie Davies enchants us with surreal portraits of forests that glow with mystical fairy lights and ominous waves of mist.  The London-based abstract photographer creates her captivating shots in natural areas throughout the UK. With the woods as her canvas, fireflies appear to illuminate desolate clearings, and cascading showers of stars dust dramatically lit patches of trees. Davies creates the dreamy illusions by combining photos of the natural world with images captured by the Hubble Space Telescope.

Davies says she likes to explore images that juxtapose human and natural elements, calling attention to the sharp divide between personal identity and interconnectivity. She does this by positioning out-of-place manmade elements within the context of wild landscapes.

“Forests are potent symbols in folklore, fairy tale and myth, places of enchantment and…

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With graffiti artist Christina Angelina’s creative touch, an abandoned water tower in the California desert has become a spectacular amphitheater covered in gorgeous murals of women’s faces. The artist collaborated with Ease One and worked night and day to blanket the walls with the dramatic, close-up paintings that emanate a cinematic glow.

Visitors to the Slab City installation must first ascend a staircase to climb over the tower’s walls and then descend a 15-foot ladder into the empty tank’s depths. By night, the faces are brought to life by dancing shadows and dramatic lighting under the dome of the starry Coachella Valley sky.

The artist, who dedicated the exhibit to appreciating women’s intuition, carefully chose the expressions for each of the women she painted. She explains on her website that “each individual face embodies a specific emotion tied to a meaningful…

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If you’ve ever been lucky enough to witness a double rainbow, you know how rare that phenomenon is. But what about a quadruple rainbow? That’s even more uncommon, though it definitely happens. Amanda Curtis snapped this gorgeous image over Glen Cove, New York on April 21 while waiting for the Long Island Railroad to arrive. It features streaks of arcing, colorful light that paint the cloudy sky as two of the rainbows intersect.

To get a sense of just how rare this sighting was, quadruple rainbows were once believed to be impossible. It wasn’t until 2011 that there was photographic evidence of a triple rainbow. Meteorologists Raymond L. Lee Jr. and Philip Laven also published a paper in…

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Over the past few years, L.A.-based graphic designer and multidisciplinary artist Paige Smith (a.k.a. A Common Name) has installed countless crystalized rock formations in cracked, decaying nooks and crannies on the streets of cities as distant as Madrid, Istanbul, and Philadelphia. These "urban geodes" pop up as hidden gems tucked away in quiet, unnoticed spaces, from the grating of a drain to the thin crevices between old bricks.

The crystals, created using spray paint and paper or silicon-molded resin, infuse everyday scenes with an unexpected touch of shimmering beauty. Subject to the sweeping forces of weather, natural deterioration, and sometimes meddling passersby, the geodes don't often stand the test of time, but their ephemeral existence highlights the small treasures found everywhere. Smith writes on her…

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Three-year-old Sapphyre Johnson was born with no toes or fingers due to a unique birth defect. Because of this, she has been a regular patient at Shriners Hospital in Greenville, South Carolina since she was an infant. When she was only a baby, doctors decided to amputate her legs, so that it would be easier for her to wear prosthetic legs, causing Sapphyre to undergo three major surgeries during the first few years of her life. 

Recently, the hospital's Child Life Specialist Elaine Hardin was contacted by Karen Riddle, a puppy breeder. Riddle told the specialist that one of her white German Shepherd puppies was born without a paw and she was wondering if any of the hospital's patients would like to care for…

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