All Posts (18613)

Tennessee-based furniture designer Barry Shields has beautifully handcrafted two coffee tables that pay homage to beloved sci-fi classics. The intricate custom pieces resemble an X-wing Starfighter from Star Wars and the U.S.S. Enterprise from Star Trek. Shields used a combination of ash, cherry, and poplar woods to carve the details that make these ships an unforgettable part of popular culture. Both are mounted on thick panes of glass that complement the vessels’ shapes.

In the case of the X-wing Starfighter, the designer made it look as though it’s rising through the transparent surface, as half of…

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Artist Gretchen Röehrs completes her playful fashion illustrations by utilizing colorful food items, as a finishing touch. From a rustic slice of bread to leafy greens, Röehrs has the ability to transform these edibles into pieces that are reminiscent of structured, flowing, and shapely articles of clothing.

In each illustration, the foods are manipulated so that they mirror the human body's many curves and angles. The twisted banana, deep red cherries, layered artichoke, and other provisions add a naturalistic texture to the sketches. This allows them to come to life, especially when Röehrs's characters appear to be out and about in a chic metropolis. The creative drawings give a whole new perspective of food that is all at once playful and artistic.…

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An adorable owlet named Fuku and a lovable Scottish Fold kitten named Marimo have become the best of friends at the Hukulou coffeehouse in Osaka, Japan. Besides enjoying each other's company in daylight, the adorable duo also have a passion for cuddling during their many naps. Seeing Fuku's feathers and Marimo's fur side-by-side is definitely a beautifully unusual sight.

Hukulou is just one of the many owl cafés that are featured in Japan. Other owls pay a visit to the café, but it seems that Marimo and Fuku have stolen the show with their unlikely, yet heartwarming friendship.

Hukulou: Website | …

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How do we add green space to our ever-growing cities? That’s one of the questions that the New York City Lowline is trying to answer, as the world's first underground park. Using solar technology, they want to transform a historic trolley terminal - untouched since 1948 - into a beautiful public gathering area that's complete with live plants and trees. It’s conceptually similar to the city’s popular High Line, which also repurposed railroad tracks and turned them into a park. As the name might suggest, the High Line is elevated.

To illuminate the underground space, Lowline plans to collect sunlight on the surrounding rooftops and use efficient mirrors to reflect the light down to street-level. The collection will then be directed underground via a series of tubes.…

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While most successful photographers prefer to stay behind the camera, Justin Barbin has earned himself a spot on the other side of the lens thanks to of his creative suit combinations. “My mom always encouraged me to dress in color,” he told BuzzFeed. “Dressing well for me is a way that I show respect for myself.”

From donning a plexiglass bow tie to using grass as a surprising pocket square replacement, Barbin is certainly captivating those that have the opportunity to view his elaborate looks. The artist – who has worked with organizations such as Nike, The Huffington Post, and Chicago Tribune – often finds himself in the midst of formal…

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Inspired by modern astrophysicists, photographer Molly Strohl uses a simple technique to photograph pinpoints of light as a way to remind us that we are all made of stars. Molly creates haunting images that beautifully embody the lonely young souls of her characters. As a viewer, you can feel the tumultuous years of youth, relate to the struggle of self-understanding, and sympathize with the thought process that goes into figuring out where you belong. It's something we all experience as we come of age. This photo series is like a warm light that serves as a gentle reminder that we are all connected and going through a similar process, even if we are unaware. Molly's series asks the question, if the universe is within us all, how could you ever truly be alone?

We were…

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When bird photographer Phoo Chan first noticed a crow flying overhead, he was astonished by an unusual turn of events. Within moments, the photographer witnessed the sight of a crow landing on the back of an eagle and, luckily, captured this bizarre joyride. Browsing through the unexpected series of photos, it's made apparent that the crow was initially flying directly above the eagle, but quickly landed and actually put its wings down once it settled in.

The experienced photographer, who has been featured by National Geographic, knows that crows are typically territorial. So, Chan stopped and stared when the sleek, black bird did not try to intimidate its larger companion. What was even more interesting was that the bald eagle did not seem to…

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Meet George (aka George2Legs), an adorable cat who seems to think that two legs are better than four. He’s often seen standing like a human, trying to make himself taller by being on his hind quarters. Besides looking ridiculously cute as he stands like this, it actually gives him a better view of the nearby action, be it just over a counter or outside a window.

Like with most cats, the entire house is George's kingdom. As the ruler of his domain, he stands wherever he pleases, adding even more height to his upright position by climbing on chairs, tables, and home appliances. With his large, puppy-dog-like eyes, George makes standing on his hind legs look less weird and more adorable.…

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Tentsile has the adventurous camper in mind with their innovative suspended tent systems. We first featured the company last year, marveling over how you could safely sleep in the trees with their sturdy, waterproof products. Since then, they’ve unveiled a few new models that allow for even more versatility when camping in the air.

Tentsile now features a triangular hammock called the Trillium that can form a multifloor outdoor living environment. You can stack them to add sleeping space for additional campers, or create a place to store extra gear, shoes, and even pets. Tentsile has also introduced…

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Artist Julie Seabrook Ream has been arranging everyday objects to form brilliant photo sets that mirror the colors of the rainbow. Using delicious foods, art supplies, and objects from nature, Ream has created collections that feature spectacular, visual motifs and an incredible amount of liveliness.

This multicolored extravaganza is actually part of an ongoing series created by Ream on Instagram. For her #100daysofrainbows project, the artist pledged to create a rainbow from items that could be found both inside and directly outside of her home. Thus far, she has experimented with seashells, books, stamps, and even with recycled cans on Earth Day. As you scroll through her Instagram feed, you can't help…

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Artist Jonathan Whitfill blends literature and art in the form of book wheel sculptures that will make you stop, stare, and maybe even read along. Whitfill gives new life to old books for his Shredder series, producing layered pieces that give off an aura of sophistication. Since many of these literary specimens display titles, library stamps, and various book pages, this also provides onlookers with the opportunity to explore the fine, antique details as they admire a nearly obsolete medium.

To create these magnificent sculptures, Whitfill starts by cutting out pages from each of the repurposed books, in order to form wedges that will fit together in a wheel formation. The books themselves are encased in a protective resin and, after being manipulated, they are secured to a…

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In an ambitious series titled Playground, photographer James Mollison documents places around the world where children laugh, cry, and run around until they're exhausted. Mollison, who previously explored where kids sleep, traveled to locales like Nairobi, Tokyo, and Los Angeles to capture these images.

There's an incredible amount of diversity among the playgrounds. Often, they are devoid of jungle gyms and swing sets, opting for large, open spaces instead. Some places contain grassy fields while others are built on dirt. Mollison also includes backdrops of dense cityscapes, palm trees, and mountains, proving that play can be anywhere.

The photographer's inspiration for Playground came from…

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On his way to work in the morning, street artist Mobstr would cycle past an average, graffiti-covered red wall in London. For years, he noticed that a city worker would paint over the graffiti with red paint, when it was below a certain line. For any graffiti above this predetermined line, the steadfast laborer would pressure-wash it off. "This prompted the start of an experiment," wrote Mobstr on his website.

Over the course of a year, the artist graffitied the wall, waited for the worker to remove it, and repeated this cat-and-mouse game over and over again. Along the way, these two individuals went through several playful exchanges that culminated into one interesting, visual story with a satisfying end. Take a look at the images, below, of Mobstr's…

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Artist Russell Powell creates stunningly realistic portraits on an unconventional surface - his own hand. The California-based teacher merges art and the body by painting eye-catching depictions of people on his palms. Incredibly, this textured and creased surface doesn’t deter him from adding intricate details and dramatic shading that gives the paintings a three-dimensional feel.

Powell’s works don’t just stay on his hands. Once he has completed a portrait, he touches his palm to paper. This process is called “hand-stamping,” and it’s how the artist records his pieces in a permanent way. He’s able to paint quickly enough that the medium doesn’t dry, meaning that his works are clearly imprinted. In addition, the stamping showcases Powell’s unique fingerprints and will always remind us from where…

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Swedish artist Susanna Hesselberg recently constructed a library that plunges into an infinite abyss. Visible only from above ground, the intriguing installation is inconspicuously marked and, from a distance, looks as though it's just a square frame laying on the grass. As viewers approach it, however, they can easily see the stacks of books descending into the earth. Its compact structure is reminiscent of a mining shaft or water well with no apparent bottom.

The realization that these texts can't actually be reached and retrieved also laces the tunnel in mystery and a certain sense of foreboding. Even the title of Hesselberg’s installation, When My Father Died It Was Like a Whole Library Had Burned Down, alludes to feelings of loss and ways of mourning. In fact,…

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Using canvases of all different dimensions, artist Michael Zavros is able to paint incredibly meticulous works of art. From paintings that can be held in the palm of your hand to those that are larger than the average human being, Zavros has tackled it all. But no matter what the artwork's size is, his work is always impeccably detailed to the point where it is reminiscent of a photograph.

With oil paints and a detail brush in hand, the painter creates short, precise brushstrokes that are barely visible. His technique is especially effective within the detailed paintings of horses and dogs, whose fur appear to blend seamlessly together. When it comes portraying the human figure, the artist flawlessly creates visual harmony in the way he captures the minute glimpses or larger-than-life…

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Rice farmers in China have carefully planted their harvest to create vast 3D works of art that are both eye-catching displays of contemporary and traditional subjects. These plant-based pieces are so intricate that they look as though they were spray-painted onto the fields. In reality, the spectacular designs were actually planned out ahead of time, utilizing rice saplings that grow to be different heights and colors. Knowing the growth patterns of each species of the crops allowed farmers to form beautiful images of detailed scenes, animals, and classic Chinese deities, months in advance.

Each year, the rice farmers are entrusted with the task of utilizing these local fields to grow different patterns, so that tourists will be inclined to visit China's northeast province of Liaoning. While this region is home to a Chinese ethnic group known as the…

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Many of us might dream about following our bliss, escaping the grind of the day-to-day life for travel and adventure, but Matt and Jessica Johnson actually took this plunge and have never looked back. In 2011, they sold their house, quit their jobs, and on August 12, departed for an indefinitely-long journey. They’ve visited 16 countries so far, including the Bahamas, Jamaica, Cuba, and Peru. And since 2012, they’ve had a third crew member in tow - their cat Georgie.

The couple adopted the feline from a no-kill animal shelter, and Georgie often accompanies them above deck. “She does very well with the sailing and is more steady on her feet than we are,” Jessica told news.com.au. Georgie loves sitting on…

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Japanese illustrator Maori Sakai takes everyday moments and turns them into positively sweet illustrations. She first caught our eye back in May with her animated GIFs that show happy moments in everyday life. When asked about the message she was trying to convey, she told us, “there's beauty in nature and in daily experiences. I think most people depend on others or a lot of money to feel this happiness, but I think, happiness is always a state of mind,” and that’s when we were hooked. Maori's positive message and happy illustrations had captured us. 

We’re thrilled to announce that we now have six of her illustrations available in the shop. You won’t…

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Before undergoing chemotherapy, Redditor Sarah K's 61-year-old mother decided that she wanted to try something new and exciting with her hair. The (not-so-)obvious solution? A hot pink mohawk!

The adventurous woman started by coloring her grey hair a vivid shade of pink and then fashioning it up like an 80's punk rocker. While this look certainly is memorable, it's not the first time this bold mom has experimented with her hair. Back in 2000, she was facing her first battle with breast cancer. At the time, she chose to have her hair reworked into tiny individual braids that covered the entirety of her head. After several weeks, she had them cut off and gave them to her close friends. "She looked like Tom Hanks with it clipped really short," Sarah shared on Reddit. "We called her Mom…

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