All Posts (19009)

When on a road trip, hauling a teardrop-style camper is easy thanks to its small size. But with this convenience comes a distinct design disadvantage: there isn’t a lot of living space. Beauer offers an ingenious solution to this problem with their 3X camper. It uses telescope-style folding to contract while towing but will grow to three times its size when parked for the night. Better yet, the mechanics couldn’t be more user friendly—just press a button and the camper slides open in about 20 seconds. There’s no unfolding of furniture or any extra steps. You simply walk inside the trailer and enjoy.

Beauer’s camper has about 43 square feet of interior space when folded, and 129 square feet when expanded. This extra area is enough to fit a bedroom, bathroom, kitchen, living, and dining room, and it has a lot of…

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While coloring books for grown-ups have gained popularity recently, a new hobby is quickly picking up steam as the craft trend of the season. Scratch Night View, a series of scratch-off projects created by Seoul-based studio Lago Design, is enchanting adults in South Korea and other parts of Asia. Using a wooden pen included in the kit, the only step required is scratching off the gray surface of the paper. Scrape by scrape, dim outlines reveal dazzling gold cityscapes that shine brightly against the black background.

Customers can choose from a line of products that includes night views of Paris, New York, Seoul, Hamburg, London, Florence, Hong Kong, and other iconic urban centers. After enjoying the meditative,…

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Photographer Randy Slavey and his wife recently embarked on a Portal-themed adventure for their son's 13th birthday. "When it came time to remodel his room for his thirteenth birthday, and he asked for a Portal room, my wife and I wanted to make sure it was something worthy of one of Aperture Laboratories’ finest young test subjects," the dedicated dad explains.

The popular video game is known for its puzzles, portal gun, and lighting effects, which the parents perfectly captured in their bedroom-focused rendition. Based on the finished product, viewers can see that a lot of thought and effort went into redesigning the 13 year old's room, especially since many of the details are hand-painted. As for the infamous…

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Today we’re spotlighting one of our most popular My Modern Shop artists, Matt Molloy. The Canadian photographer first hit our radar back in 2012 with his incredible collection of gorgeous smeared skies. He shared his awe-inspiring process with us in this exclusive interview. At first glance, the seamless smears appear effortless, as though they were created with the strokes of a paintbrush. However, we were amazed to find that each image was actually the product of stacking hundreds of timelapse photos together, patiently shot on a daily basis, over the span of three years.

We want to wholeheartedly thank the…

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Photographer Ellen Cantor has found a way to artistically express that books are the source of her favorite memories. "My current project, entitled Prior Pleasures, is deeply influenced by my love of literature," she revealed. "This series explores memory and preservation of the past while ensuring the creation of a visual legacy for the next generation. The books photographed for this series are the ones I have carried with me since childhood. My mother read them to me and, in turn, I read them to my children, carrying on a tradition of the written and spoken word."

A total of 25 classic childhood books were photographed, including Black Beauty, Heidi,…

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At first glance, the characters painted by Argenis Pinal (aka argenapeede) look like they're from the pages of a comic book. Upon closer inspection, however, it’s clear that these aren’t stylized pen and ink drawings—they’re actually photos of him with expertly applied face paint! The California-based cosmetologist applies his own makeup and hair styles to imitate a number of famous superheroes and villains, including the Joker, Tony Stark, and Thor. He also puts his own spin on these iconic personalities by creating zombified versions of X Men's Wolverine and Rogue.

To achieve these amazing effects, Pinal uses dark, heavy lines to contour his face, creating different shapes and mimicking the type of outlines you’d find in the comics. He then complements his painting skills with…

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Whether it's the gorgeous architecture, shops filled with decadent pastries, or spectacular landmarks steeped in centuries of history, there's something in Paris for everyone to fall in love with. For celebrated graphic designer Louise Fili, it was the city's dazzling signage that captured her heart over 40 years ago at the age of 20, when she first laid eyes on the unique typography dotting the fronts of hotels, bakeries, and restaurants. Since then, she has returned to the City of Lights time and time again, camera and map in hand as she strolls along the winding cobblestone paths while photographing the beautiful work of generations of sign craftsmen.

Glowing neon marquees, colorful murals, gold-leaf placards, and whimsical pictorial signs in styles like Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Futurism are catalogued in…

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As summer winds down to an end, so do all the trends that came with it, including the popular rainbow-colored ‘Sand Art Hair’ trend. Hair enthusiasts, fear not! When one trend ends, a new one begins. Now, for this season-transitioning period, hair experimentalists are muting out their psychedelic strands of summer into dispersed wisps of hues peaking through ivory locks—an effect that has been dubbed ‘Opal Hair.’

Each woman taking part in this trend has a unique glimmer of quiet vibrance emanating from her head, much like the spectrum of colors caught in the reflection of an opal stone. If nothing else, the Opal Hair trend is the visual representation of a youthful summer coming to a close, but the experiences living on as bright, flashing memories. As a new…

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September in rural Japan means two things: farmers are harvesting their rice and the leftover straw is being used to make extraordinary works of art. Specifically, the resulting material is serving as a tool for an artist Amy Goda, who's creating some pretty terrifying dinosaur sculptures. The talented unconventional sculptor also has a knack for fashioning other giant beasts, including an intimidating praying mantis, an antagonistic crab, and an angry king cobra.

All of Goda's rice straw-related work has culminated in the yearly Wara Art Festival, which prides itself on recycling the otherwise useless matter. The event is held in the Niigata Prefecture region's Uwasekigata Park and will remain there until the end of November. If you want to see what happens when your average park features…

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Bryan Ware was inspired to create The Crayon Initiative while watching his two sons color during a birthday dinner. “I wondered, ‘What happens to these crayons after we leave if we don’t take them with us?'” the dad told The Mighty. Later, he asked a restaurant employee this same question and was upset to hear that all the crayons are thrown out after they leave—even if they're left untouched. To change the crayons' wasteful fate, Ware began to take them home because he was sure he could find a way to give these unwanted coloring tools to a kid in need.

From this simple, yet extremely considerate idea, The Crayon Initiative was born. This nonprofit organization's…

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Known for her darkly beautiful and surrealistic oil paintings of young women, Armenian-born, California-based artist Alexandra Manukyan explores a new direction in Oracle of Extinction—a collection of powerful works that highlight humanity's catastrophic impact on the environment, and how our behavior will affect the future of our planet. The series, which is currently on display at Copro Gallery in Los Angeles through September 5, pairs Manukyan's familiar, regal heroines with animals that have suffered at the hands of mankind. Reduced to skin and bones, their pitiful forms choked by waste and debris, the creatures are left to the mercy of the goddess-like figures.

Although painted using traditional methods in a classical style,…

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Have you ever wondered what an Imperial Stormtrooper does on their day off? Photographer Jorge Pérez Higuera has, and his series The Other Side takes an amusingly revealing look at what that entails. Turns out, it’s not all that different from us: they’re reading food labels at the grocery store; washing dishes; paying bills; and even relaxing in a jacuzzi with a fancy cocktail.

Higuera first embarked on this whimsical project while in his last year of college in Madrid, Spain, when he received a second-hand Star Wars Stormtrooper costume. He officially started it in 2012, enamored with the idea that these galactic fighters performed the same mundane tasks as everyone else. “They represent the galactic…

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The Wildlife Photographer of the Year is one of our favorite photography competitions, and they’ve recently revealed a first look at ten of the contest’s finalists. These chosen images are all visually stunning, depicting scenes that range from poignant to heartwarming to bizarre. Wrestling Komodo dragons, a shark-repellent surfboard, and a concerned gorilla are just a few of the remarkable entries.

The contest attracted over 42,000 photographs from both professionals and amateurs in 96 countries. Winning images will be announced on October 13, and on October 16, an exhibition of the 100 shortlisted photographs will open at the Natural History Museum…

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Sculptor Edoardo Tresoldi is known for crafting stunningly life-like figures with sheets of wire mesh. Using these same skills, the artist has created Incipit, a towering installation that recently appeared at the Meeting del Mare in Camerota, Italy. The architecturally-inspired work features gigantic arched passageways with a flock of birds surrounding its peak.

Tresoldi’s use of the gridded material gives the piece a distinctive presence. The thin wire, with its countless tiny squares, makes his massive creation mostly see through. Against the blue sky, Incipit appears as an ethereal, almost ghostly form, a characteristic that’s…

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Since 2012, Polish photographer Izabela Urbaniak has been documenting the adventures of her children playing outdoors in the countryside every summer. For more than a month each year, Urbaniak and her family disconnect from technology, choosing instead to immerse themselves in the beautiful natural surroundings of Lugowiska, a tiny village in Poland. Unplugged from computers, the internet, and video games, Urbaniak's children enjoy idyllic summers filled with sunshine, laughter, and the thrill of running around without a care in the world.

The photographer's black-and-white images capture priceless, candid moments in the daily lives of her children. Her sons, Julian, 13, and Antoni, 9, are pictured playing with their…

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Is there anything better than pictures of adorable animals? The creature-loving scientists, zoos, and aquariums on Twitter definitely don't think so. This week, a variety of animal experts and organizations decided to demonstrate just how passionate they are about the other species that call Earth home—the super cute ones, in particular.

In a social media battle known as the #CuteOff, animal lovers everywhere shared photos of the most adorable critters for this fun competition. They even started their own teams with hashtags like #TeamHerpetology and #TeamEntomology. Even though there was never a clear winner crowned, this competition turned Twitter into a sea of cute animal images, which makes us all the winners. We've collected some of our favorites and can't help but agree with every single entry—these are some really cute…

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Model Rebekah Marine has established that you can still pursue your passion even if you have a disability. At a young age, she was told that she wouldn't have a future in modeling because she was born without a right forearm. This caused her to give up on her dream, return to school, and work a traditional full-time job. Things changed when she received her i-limb quantum prosthesis four years ago. After receiving her new prosthetic arm, she realized that a standard job wasn't enough for her. Instead, she wanted to turn her impairment into a source of inspiration.

Marine decided to continue following her dream and pursue a career as a model. In February, she walked the runway at New York Fashion Week and even worked with Nordstrom for their anniversary catalog. She's also become an ambassador for the…

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In her nature-inspired works of art, Heather Fortner not only depicts the forms of fish, but does so using the actual bodies of the fish. The technique is called gyotaku (魚 gyo "fish" + 拓 taku "rubbing"), a traditional Japanese method of fish printing that originated in the mid-19th century as a way for fishermen to record the size and characteristics of their daily catches. Anglers would keep a supply of rice paper, sumi ink, and brushes on their boats so that they could make ink etchings of their freshly caught fish; the prints were so accurate that they were often used to determine the winners of fishing contests in Japan.

There are two ways of applying gyotaku: direct and indirect. The technique of direct printing, which Fortner employs, involves applying ink or paint directly on the body of the fish, then…

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Forget drab walls, cramped cubicles, and the daily 9-to-5 grind. Imagine working in an office out on the open sea—gazing out at blue waves and azure skies, feeling the warmth of sunshine, and smelling the ocean breeze while pushing your creativity and innovation further than ever before. That fantasy will become a reality with the launch of Coboat, a revolutionary idea that will allow digital nomads to take part in the first co-working space to hit the high seas. Founded by international innovators who met on the shores of Thailand, Coboat provides a mobile office and home for professionals who wish to circumnavigate the globe, explore uncharted waters, and embark on an exciting adventure combining work, life, and play.

The 82-foot catamaran, which is entirely solar- and wind-powered with a…

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Photographer Andi Last has perfectly demonstrated how one can own their transformation during chemotherapy. Thirteen days after she started her breast cancer treatment, the inspiring woman began to lose her hair. Rather than dwelling on this external change, she decided to get creative and have fun with her metamorphosis.

She's utilized various wigs, hats, henna tattoos, and has even embraced her baldness over the course of her chemo process. Not only is this a beautiful representation of creativity, it's also proof that one's resilient strength can come in handy when approaching any challenge. "Breast cancer is the most difficult thing I've ever dealt with," Last …

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