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When picturing a meteorite, we generally think of it as something that’s jagged with a rough texture. Reddit user Isai76, however, recently shared something unexpected - a polished meteorite! It was posted in the subreddit called Damnthatsinteresting, a place that welcomes the rare and unusual. The shiny rock hardly looks like a meteorite at all, and it features brilliant metallic bits underneath a glass-like surface.

In addition to the photo, fellow Redditor fewthe3rd explained what makes this polished piece so special. It’s technically a pallasitic meteorite, and the green-yellow transparent minerals are called olivine, which composes most of the upper mantle of the Earth. The metallic parts are an iron-nickel alloy.

Here’s where it gets interesting. The mixture of the iron-nickel alloy and olivine originated from a small protoplanet out of the dawn of the Solar…

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Photographer Vincent Laforet flies high over the city of Los Angeles and turns his airborne perspective into captivating nighttime shots of the city. After the sun has gone down, Laforet goes up in a helicopter and uses his expertise to capture perfectly exposed frames that showcase LA’s vibrant nightlife. The crystal-clear images, pastel colors and twinkling lights make Los Angeles look like a picturesque miniature model rather than the life-size city in all its glory. From other perspectives, the highways blur out until the glowing infrastructure simply looks like a computer switchboard.

Laforet has used similar techniques to photograph other famous cities, but he says Los Angeles is by far the most difficult to frame. That’s because it’s a sprawling metropolis comprised of a chaotic grid of highways and rambling neighborhood…

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We know that life shouldn’t be all work and no play, but just how much do we abide by that? This eye-opening infographic, by Vicky Leta for Mashable, is based on data collected from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)’s Better Life Index. It looks at a couple of things: how many hours (on average) a person spends working a year, and how satisfied they are with the time committed to their profession.

The Netherlands, Germany, and Norway are all at the top of this list, meaning that they spend the least amount of hours - ranging from 1,381 to 1,420 - per year on their work. Those countries have a high satisfaction rate, too, of around 80%. Greece, Korea, and Mexico all spend the most time on the job. They average well over 2,000 hours per year. Surprisingly, however, their satisfaction rate doesn’t drop as much as you might think. Korea and Mexico are…

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For centuries, opera houses have stood as the symbol of a nation's wealth and grandeur. David Leventi celebrates these cultural landmarks by photographing the interiors of world-famous opera houses around the globe, capturing the spectacular architecture and ornate decor of vast halls in Budapest, Paris, Buenos Aires, and more.

Alternating between the vantage point of a singer and the perspective of an audience member, Leventi presents a two-fold picture of the opera experience in stunning, large-format detail. From center stage, stars gaze out at the endlessly extending rows of seats underneath magnificently elaborate ceilings. On the flip side, the audience is treated to the beautiful sights and sounds of talented singers standing beneath velvet red curtains.

"The project is…

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All is not what it seems in this fascinating new work by artist Angelo Musco. Called P1 (Aves), at first glance it looks like a digital photo of a floating feather but upon closer inspection you'll notice that the feather is made up of tens of thousands of nude bodies. Musco created this image by first photographing dozens of live models in pre-planned poses. Working in Photoshop, he then weaved each individual figure with the other, meticulously adjusting for tone and shadow.

As he states, "In the Aves series, the images are minimal and restrained on the surface but complex, poetic and compelling just below the surface. The images are presented lightly floating on the air or gently falling downward, a frozen dance, a silent musical bridge, an…

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Still looking for that perfect gift for Mother's Day? We're here to help. From now till May 10th, buy an art print or canvas at My Modern Shop and enter THANKSMOM in the promo code section to receive 25% off your entire order. My Modern Shop is a curated art store that sells only works featured on My Modern Met. From Matt Molloy's surreal skies to Andrea Minin's graphic whales, you'll find a diverse set of art there. Happy Shopping!

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The Eshima Ohashi bridge is the largest rigid-frame bridge in Japan and the third largest in the world, but its uniqueness does not stop there. This incredible structure appears to have an extraordinarily steep incline on both sides, making it look more like a roller coaster that you can enjoy from the seat of your car.

The astounding bridge connects the cities of Matsue and Sakaiminato, which rises above Lake Nakaumi. Since many boats utilize the lake for transportation, the architects decided to make it lofty enough for ships to easily pass underneath. The bridge reaches a tremendous height of 44 meters, with a 5.1% and 6.1% incline on each side. …

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Colombia-born, New York-based artist Alexis Duque creates highly detailed paintings of incredibly crowded cities. The 42-year-old works with just a few colors, but his acrylic paintings are anything but simple. Each piece can take between one week to one month to complete. His paintings often show over-populated capital cities in developing countries. Through his works, he hopes to shed light on the chaotic and unavoidable processes of urbanization in our globalized and overpopulated world.

As he told us, "I am obsessed with imaginary cities, sometimes I like to depict futuristic architectural metropolises, and other times, I am inspired by slums and shanty towns from developing countries, overflowed with crowded objects and furniture in an uncontrollable growth of accumulation and waste."

What is his creative process like? "I prime and stretch the…

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For the past decade, Norwegian photographer Lars Anderson has documented one particular alleyway in the city of Tromsø, Norway for a project titled In the Alley. Measuring 100 feet in length, the narrow, graffiti-filled passageway connects two streets. According to Anderson, few people stop and linger here, save for those who put up posters advertising cultural events on the walls, and those who use the alley as a place to urinate after a busy Saturday night.

The alley is a seemingly mundane part of the urban scene, yet it's described by the photographer as "obscure, dark and bizarrely beautiful." Ten years of shooting the alley has given Andersen an appreciation for the space and the people who navigate it. He says, "Every day the alley itself is evolving. People are continuously moving through, leaving their imprint. A decade of photographing it has proved just…

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These colorful works by Spanish architects Marta Alonso Yebra and Imanol Calderón Elósegui will fool you. At first glance, they might look like stained glass, but they’re actually melted gummy bears. The decorative wall hangings are called “light boxes,” and they delight us with their gorgeous hues and exquisite marbling. Plus, Yebra and Elósegui’s handiwork has a faint fruity smell to it.

Yerba first developed the unusual technique as an art student. She wanted to work with glass, but it was too expensive, and melting plastic produced too many harmful effects. The inspiration for using gummy bears happened as she was snacking on some. Yerba told Wired, “I realized, wait: This is very beautiful, and it’s similar to plastic, but we can eat it. I was sure if I…

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Colombia-born Los Angeles-based artist Maria E. Piñeres uses traditional needlepoint to create intricate works of modern art. Her portraits of people are comprised of detailed stitch patterns. Each of her subjects, which range from close friends to new acquaintances, sat for the artist as she stitched their portraits. In the piece above, entitled Leo, Piñeres’s godson is seen staring at the viewer while one of his eyes is masked behind his long bangs. On his shirt and shorts are different camouflage patterns and he sits on a a camouflaged patterned chair.

When we asked how the artist fell into stitching as an art form, she said, "Portraiture has always been one of my favorite subjects in art. When I first started needlepointing, I did some portraits but they were very…

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Tokyo-based artist Hikaru Cho is back again with more captivating makeup transformations. This time, the exceptionally talented artist used her expert makeup skills to create hyperrealistic illusions of floating dismembered heads and altered human faces.

The designs were commissioned by Samsung for the launch of their Galaxy S6 phones, so all of the works of art were inspired by this technology. The creations have a high-tech aspect to them, combining parts of the human body with the characteristics of the newest electronics.

The floating heads are meant to represent the phone's wireless…

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The game of golf is being changed for the better, thanks to a remarkable new invention. The GolfBoard is a lithium ion battery-powered form of transportation that allows golfers to easily move themselves and their gear to any destination on the course. 

This futuristic creation feels similar to a skateboard, snowboard, or surfboard in that it allows riders to essentially "surf the earth." The GolfBoard has less impact on grass and is also simple to operate, allowing users to choose between a wireless handheld controller and an on-board thumb-throttle. This helps golfers control the speed, while their side-to-side movement guides the steering. Various golf courses across the United States are allowing members to utilize…

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Russian photographer Olga Barantseva captured these incredible shots of beautiful models posing with a giant brown bear in a snowy forest near Moscow. The images look straight out of a fairytale, showing a softer side to the big predator. As part of an anti-hunting campaign, the extraordinary photos are meant to "show the natural harmony between humans and bears," according to Barantseva.

The bear, named Stepan, weighs more than 1,400 pounds and stands at a height of over 7 feet, but he is completely docile and willing to pose with his human collaborators. Stepan was rescued from hunters as a cub by his owner, professional circus trainer Yury Panteleenko. The bear was raised to be people-friendly, and has played roles in over 20 Russian films. For this shoot, Stepan was coaxed into different poses by his trainer with the help of mozzarella and sweet cookies, two of his…

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When wildlife photographer Melissa Groo got tipped off by friends that a family of red foxes had set up a home in a backyard shed in Lansing, New York, she made it her mission to photograph them. She didn't just snap one or two shots, she spent an entire season with the family, watching the kits as they grew up right before her very eyes in suburban New York. Groo hid herself by setting up a pop-up blind near the family where she would quietly sneak in to take her shots. The picture above, of six baby foxes sitting together, was captured on the first or second day she started photographing them.

As she told MNN, "The original crew. When I would approach the blind upon each visit, if the foxes were in view, they would warily…

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Google is a great tool for answering countless queries, including finding out the cost of something. But did you ever wonder what was the most searched-for good in your country? Around the world? Fixr, a cost estimating site, attempts to answer this with an intriguing infographic revealing the different inquiries across the globe. They took the top Google autocomplete searches for “How much does * cost in (country),” and then made a map of the results.

Google searches for costs vary depending on the country. In part of North America, people want to know how much a patent or passport costs. Or, in Mexico, a tummy tuck. There are (slightly) more practical concerns in Europe as users inquire about the cost of gas, studying, and food. Owning a BMW or Ferarri still pops up on the map, though. Fixr’s infographic illustrates what we already know - there are vast differences in…

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We’ve recently seen the magic that time and a lot of Post-it notes can produce, and in this video, it’s no different. To celebrate White Day in South Korea (an amorous holiday that falls on March 14), advertising agency Innored and Post-it teamed up to help a guy romantically propose to his girlfriend. It was captured in the form of a sweet video and shows how this three-inch-square sticky note can make a huge impact.

The clever wedding proposal starts by the man leading his unsuspecting girlfriend into an empty cafe. He makes an excuse to leave, calls her, and then tells her to look at the glass building outside. There, she sees a team of 250 people swiftly assembling a special message just for her. When completed, it spells out “Soojung, will you marry me?” in a mosaic of…

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Photographer Karl Lundholm may have been born and raised on the west coast of Sweden, but he dreamed of traveling to somewhere he could hear the sound of crashing waves and feel the warmth of sunshine on his skin. Living overseas in Australia became his "little dream" until he actually made the trip in 2014, when that fantasy become reality. Since then, Lundholm has spent the past year living in Queensland, where he captures stunning photographs of sparkling ocean waves against the gorgeous backdrop of the setting sun.

Each of Lundholm's images is a unique expression of the sea's beauty, as no two waves are alike. Giant swells of water glisten like glass, while wild breakers send crystal-clear droplets splattering in the air. Although the photographer doesn't surf himself, several of his images feature the dynamic silhouettes of surfers looking to ride the waves on the…

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The Cut is back with another installment of 100 Years of Beauty, in which they condense a century's worth of female beauty, hairstyle, and makeup trends into one fascinating minute. After taking us around the globe from the US to Iran to North and South Korea, the Cut added some Latina spice to their series with a new video focusing on Mexico.

The model, Reyna, shows off her playful spirit while embodying the bold beauty of Mexico. Each look is wildly different, progressing from the guerilla-inspired aesthetic of the 1910 Mexican Revolution, to the sensual smolder of a 1950s Maria Félix-esque look, to…

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Get whisked away into a surreal fantasyland by viewing these bold illustrations by Jenny Liz Rome. The Canada-based illustrator, who's known for her images of wild animals blended with female figures, shows us just what happens when sensual femininity is mixed with raw animal imagery. Rome studied art at Ontario College of Art and Design University (OCAD), where she graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2009. Her mixed media works combine photography, drawing and painting. The artist states that she takes inspiration from wildlife, classic style, and the female form.

We're excited to announce that we will now be carrying six of Rome's works at My Modern Shop. Dress up your bare walls with either prints or canvases of Rome's illustrations. Love the ones in pink...they pop!…

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