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This recently released picture book offers a strong female role model for every letter of the alphabet. Designed to teach the ABCs from a new and creative angle, Rad American Women is making its debut on the children’s literature scene. Within its colorful pages, author Kate Schatz and illustrator Miriam Klein Stahl familiarize children with the faces and accomplishments of notable American women who worked to change culture. It even includes an ode to unnamed women everywhere who are making our communities better.

Each page is labeled with a letter that corresponds with a famous female, ranging from Angela Davis to Zora Neale Hurston. The pages touch the realms of architecture, activism, music, government, science and more. In addition to the informative text, stylish, vibrantly colored illustrations engage young readers as well as old.

Although simplistic…

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Hamburg-Germany based illustrator Julian Rentzsch has teamed up with Steffen Heidemann and Viktoria Klein at Stellavie, an independent design studio, to create a unique set of posters featuring movie directors merged with their famous films. So far, the team has released three posters - Alfred Hitchcock, Martin Scorsese and David Lynch. The prints portray these movie directors and their groundbreaking work within the history of cinematography. By combining their faces with images of scenes from their famous movies, we get to appreciate the fine details in this work. At the bottom of each print, you'll find a quote from each director that sums up their approach to filmmaking. "Our main goal with the prints is to inspire others to look behind the scenes!," the group says.

The prints were a true collaboration, in every sense of the word. While…

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After a tragic accident left An Rong's elderly mother confined to a wheelchair, the 87-year-old woman suffered from depression, often spending entire days in her bed without eating or drinking. 42-year-old An, the youngest in her family, began to worry even more when she noticed her mother becoming unusually forgetful. An and her sister had to leave notes around the house reminding their mom to do everyday things like eat dinner and take her keys with her when she went out. A trip to the doctor's and a CT scan revealed that her brain was slowly shrinking. That, plus the elderly woman's depression and worsening physical health, spurred An's decision to take her mother traveling for the first time in an effort to help her cheer up and live life to the fullest.

An's mother flew for the first time in 2006 when An, her mother, her sister, and her niece…

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Illustrator and designer David Olenick has a knack for pairing adorable characters with a biting wit. His minimalist artworks grace a variety of products like pillows and greeting cards but are most popular on t-shirts. Smiling foods, unhappy umbrellas, and puzzled dinosaurs accompany short sayings that reveal what the subject is thinking. Olenick’s designs give us a funny glimpse into these ridiculous inner monologues.

Anxiety, embarrassment, and character flaws all inspire the creative’s work. A lot of his ideas are born in bars and restaurants, suggesting that these types of things don’t come from hours of brainstorming. Instead, Olenick’s illustrations seem like they could begin as funny thoughts or conversations that are then best worked out on napkins.

Check out his Tumblr and you’ll…

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For this year's Art Paris Art Fair, every night, from March 26 till March 29, the facade of the iconic Grand Palais will turn into a beautiful, digital canvas. Three different video projections will transform the exterior of the building from 6pm to midnight. 2014 was the first year Art Paris Art Fair organized a projection, Miguel Chevalier's The Origin of the World, and this year, they've selected three artists, out of the 15 submitted, to show off their work.

TeamLab, an art collective of over 350 members, has covered the Grand Palais in a cascade of running water. Universe of Water Particles is a mesmerizing waterfall projection that makes the historic site look as if it's under a deluge. (For those wondering, this is the same company that recently created the…

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Get lost in the magnificent landscapes of Western Australia captured by Perth-based photographer Chris Beecroft. Moody tones and stark compositions paint a wanderlust-worthy picture of the region's sweeping valleys, craggy mountains, and secluded waterfalls. Devoid of people save for solitary figures who appear tiny in comparison to the vast land, these nature scenes are wild, grandiose, and breathtaking in their beauty.

Chris Beecroft's website
Chris Beecroft on Tumblr…

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Meet the Ili pika (Ochotona iliensis), an extremely elusive, cuddly creature that is rarely seen by human eyes. Native to a remote region of China, the adorable mammal has been spotted only a handful of times in the Tianshan Mountains of the northwestern province of Xinjiang. Nicknamed the "magic rabbit" by the volunteers who study it, the teddy bear-like animal measures about 20 centimeters long, and is a distant relative of the rabbit.

Ili pikas were discovered and named by Li Weidong, a conservationist who first came across the unknown species in 1983 while on government assignment near Jilimalale Mountain. Over the next decade, Li and his colleagues conducted a number of studies in the mountains, discovering that the furry critters live on bare rock faces and feed on grasses, herbs, and other plants at high elevations. In 1992, however, Li left to work with the…

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From March 20 to March 29, Eindhoven in the Netherlands is hosting one of Europe's most major art and technology events, the STRP Biennial. For 10 days, four large industrial halls are filled with monumental installations, cutting edge music and spectacular performances. This biennial focuses on the omnipresence of screens as it has called upon artists to show works that are digital in nature, and, yet somehow, break through the screen.

Two notable installations are Hakanaï by French duo Adrien M & Claire B and Parallels by Nonotak. In Japanese, the word ‘hakanaï’ is used to define the ephemeral, the fragile. In this installation, a single dancer moves within a cloth cube, interacting with the images projected on the walls. The work is a beautiful convergence of dance and visual art. Watch the video below to see it in…

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This beautiful, geometric “telescope” turns gazing at the sky into a mesmerizing experience. From the outside, the piece looks like a plain, white cylinder. But if you stoop low and step inside, the white walls open up into a soaring dome that divides an onlooker’s view of the sky into intricate patterns.

Shoko Konishi, a student at Tama Art University in Japan, created the dome with sheets of laminated cardboard, which she rolled up and pressed together. The compressed cardboard rolls take on elegant teardrop shapes and transform into a labyrinth-like design. The paper’s shiny surface is reflective, capturing light from the changing sky and magnifying it.

Konishi titled the piece Transition because its purpose it to help the viewer watch the sky change from a new perspective. The structure focuses your vision and allows you to appreciate the details that may…

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For years, we’ve admired how Brazilian street artist L7m paints gorgeous portraits of birds. His murals are always full of color and have a palpable energy, and he’s recently brought that same intensity to the streets of Paris and Vitry in France. L7m’s newest pieces blur the line between realism and abstraction, adding in aspects of both to produce stunning artwork with vibrant details.

In each painting, L7m portrays a clear portrait of a bird’s head and uses brilliant pinks, purples, and blues to accent the feathers. He then surrounds these realistic depictions with visual chaos. At times, it mimics the creatures in motion while also adding decorative splendor. Long brush strokes and scribbled lines interact with one another to form clouds of both confusion and beauty. When positioned…

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Adam Savage, perhaps best known as the co-host of MythBusters, is a huge Stanley Kubrick fan. He visited a traveling exhibit about the famed director’s films (it included scripts, memorabilia, and more) three times and spent a total of 10 hours taking it all in. But, he was ultimately disappointed that the hedge maze from the Overlook Hotel in The Shining wasn't properly represented. The famous architectural model featured in the exhibit was nothing like it was in the film. This really bothered Savage, and it inspired him to build an accurate hedge maze model of his own.

If this sounds like it’d be a painstaking endeavor, you’re right. The architectural model wasn't shown for long in the film, and Savage had to use reference screenshots to get everything correct. He spent three hours drawing a blueprint for the maze and then started constructing the…

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"Don't paint the scene in front of you. Paint the light that defines it and gives it life." Though he was raised on a farm in the Midwest, Thomas W. Schaller spent the majority of his life in Manhattan where he worked as a commercial architectural artist. Today, however, he works for himself, as a watercolor painter based in Los Angeles. Schaller made the jump to a different profession after one of his artist friends asked him what he wanted to do with his life. "I told him I wanted to be a painter, a 'real artist,'" he recalls, "but then I proceeded to detail all the reasons I had constructed that seemed to make that dream impossible. He listened politely to all my excuses and then said simply: 'If you want to paint - just paint. All the rest will take care of itself.'"

That day, Schaller's life changed. His background in…

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In the summer of 1970, French photographer Jack Garofalo (1923-2004) spent six weeks in Harlem, NYC shooting a series of photos for the cover story of Paris Match magazine. His candid street shots document the vibrant sights and culture of Harlem, focusing primarily on the predominantly black residents and their daily lives.

Many of the subjects of Garofalo's photos were people who couldn't afford or chose not to leave Harlem during a tumultuous period of migration. In the 1960s, large numbers of residents moved from the Manhattan neighborhood to Queens, Brooklyn, and the Bronx in search of improved housing, better schools, and a stronger sense of safety. Despite the mass exodus that left behind many poor, uneducated, and unemployed locals, Harlem's life and vitality were in no way diminished. As these striking images show, Harlem still buzzed with bold…

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It's estimated that nearly 300 million people across the globe are affected by colorblindness. Valspar Paint, in partnership with EnChroma, is helping individuals experience color for the first time through their campaign #ColorForAll. In the touching short documentary Color for the Colorblind, Valspar Paint provides individuals with EnChroma's colorblindness-correcting eyeglasses, letting them finally experience the joys of a world filled with vibrant hues and shades.

The heartwarming video shows the emotional impact of being able to see certain colors for the first time. A man named Andrew says, "There are some drawings where I wish I could see how my kids put the colors together and what they were visualizing." With the glasses on, he can finally see the full range of pigments in his son's artwork.…

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Olek, a self-proclaimed “crochet graffiti” artist, recently brightened up a homeless shelter in India by swaddling the entire building in a colorful, knitted tapestry. The New York City-based artist completed her project as part of the Indian street art festival St+art Delhi, which is commissioning artists to beautify shelters to highlight the social issue of homelessness. The goal is “giving a new face to these structures and visibility to the people who live in them,” according to the festival’s website.

This particular shelter, Raine Basera, offers temporary, overnight lodging to women who are down on their luck. To make the project a reality, Olek spent a week manning a large team of volunteers and knitted alongside local women. The finished patchwork of colorful doilies depicts flowers, butterflies and elephants stretched across the building’s roof and walls. The…

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Designer Hella Jongerius’ Nymphenburg Sketches series features enchanting sculptures of small animals sitting in the middle of white porcelain bowls. In the collection, charming animal figurines sit or stand serenely while surrounded by intricate, hand-painted flowers or other nature-inspired patterns.

The series was commissioned by Bavarian porcelain manufacturer Nymphenburg, which has been in business since the 18th century. The delicate floral patterns that wrap around the animal figurines are based on historic, traditional designs from the company’s archives.

The shallow, decorative bowls are ideal for using as dresser-top trinket dishes to catch jewelry or other small items, but they can add a touch of sophistication to any living space. The variety of animals Jongerius artfully incorporated into her pieces is fascinating. With her touch, even snails and…

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Ready to see the world like you've never seen it before? AirPano, a not-for-profit company that focuses on high-resolution panoramic shots, has traveled to over 230 breathtaking locations on our planet, giving us the most incredible aerial views of this earth. While they're known for their 360° panoramas, which you can see on their website, the group also has a collection of stunning photos of famous cities, like New York, Barcelona, and Paris, as well as images of nature's most beautiful destinations including the roaring Iguazu Falls (as seen above).

The team consists of 12 members, nine photographers and three tech specialists, who use planes, helicopters and drones to shoot from high above. The company started back in 2006.

AirPano has an app called AirPano…

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There’s no shortage of pets that need a good home, but how do you best show people that their new pal is waiting for them at the shelter? The Humane Society of Utah has an ingenious way of enticing potential owners to adopt homeless dogs. Photographer Guinnevere Shuster captured the pups’ colorful personalities in a series of four small images that look delightfully candid and a lot of fun.

The photobooth-style portraits showcase a lot of tongue-wagging grins, and it's clear that the dogs are ready to play fetch at any moment. Shuster also saw some hilariously goofy faces and intense concentration as the pooches attempt to catch flying treats. These endearing images cast aside the “broken” stereotype and prove that these shelter dogs are going to make super pets.

There are more adorable canines on the Humane Society’s…

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In this exquisite and fully-immersive installation, 2,300 flowers are suspended in a room and respond to the moment when a visitor enters their space. The blooms greet the person by moving towards them and eventually floating close above their head. This creates a small dome, and the viewer is then surrounded by a gorgeous sea of colorful vegetation.

The installation is the handiwork of teamLab, a collective made up of tech specialists based in Tokyo, Japan. They call it Floating Flower Garden, and it’s part of a large-scale exhibition at Miraikan National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation.

TeamLab’s interactive display allows a person to become completely one with the garden.…

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Street Art That Only Appears When It Rains

Now this is a fun idea we can get behind! Instead of sulking because it's raining outside, why not discover some hidden street art? Seattle, a city that's known for its rain, is now the place where you can find this rain-activated art, or what creator Peregrine Church calls "rainworks." Using stencils and super hydrophobic coating, he puts up familiar games like hopscotch or positive messages on the ground. Best part is that these works are completely non-toxic, environmentally safe and biodegradable. They last up to 4 months a year, slowly fading away as time passes. Because they're temporary, don't harm property, and are not a form of advertising, they're also completely legal in Seattle.

So, how does it work? The protective coating of the super hydrophobic product forms a waterproof layer that's invisible to the naked eye. All liquid…

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