My Modern MetMy Modern Met Logo

All Posts (17749)

Artist Colin Batty puts an amusingly strange spin on photographs of the past. Taking cabinet cards from the early 1900s, he uses acrylic paint and crafts entirely new and surprising scenes directly on the image. His additions are often hilarious but also creepy, and he does a fantastic job of seamlessly matching the colors and shading of each vintage photo - without the help of the computer. It’s so convincing that at first glance, you might not notice the images were even changed.

Batty enjoys taking a dull photograph from the past and transforming it into something absurd and unusual. No one is safe from his wild embellishments. A young girl with an eyeball for a head and people with snail-like tails are just some of the things you’ll find in his works.

In addition to his skill, Batty is also a prolific artist. He painted 100 of these cabinet cards in 2014 for his…

Read more…

The otters at Japan’s Keikyu Aburatsubo Marine Park live in a truly amazing habitat that shows off the animals’ carefree demeanor. Clear tubes — some straight and some circular — act as waterways that allow the otters to swim lightheartedly in fun patterns. The circular tubes function much like roundabouts on city streets, enabling “traffic flow” to change directions on a dime.

When the otters aren’t swimming, they have plenty of other activities available. The clear tubes are only part of the zoo’s innovative exhibit that includes spacious, glass-encased tanks, ladders and toys on dry land. Because they’re kept so happy in a stimulating environment, the otters even seem pleased to interact with guests through the glass.…

Read more…

Cathy Van Hoang’s adorably creative planters turn sea urchin shells into pots and make air plants look like whimsical jellyfish. The artist paints the shells soft, pastel colors and then pots wispy air plants in them. When hung upside down, the shell forms the spiny body of a jellyfish, and the air plant’s arms look like squiggly tentacles extending outward. Because the arms look like they're floating in ocean water, the planters make it easy to imagine you're looking at a delightful underwater scene.

The jellyfish planters are available on Van Hoang’s Etsy store for about $25 each.

Cathy Van Hoang's Etsy…

Read more…

New York City has been the subject of many photographers' snapshots, but the Big Apple has rarely been captured from a viewpoint as unique as a toddler's perspective. Diego Acosta López, a student at the School of Visual Arts, wanted to get inside his son Ignacio's head as he experienced the thrill of NYC for the first time. He accomplished this by mounting a GoPro camera to the inside of the toddler's stroller when Ignacio and his mother came from Quito, Ecuador to visit López for a month last year.

The GoPro, set to take a picture every 10 seconds, captured around 2,000 photos each day. Common NYC sights like the subway, Central Park, and Times Square are transformed into new scenes by the unique perspective and the distortion of shapes and colors through the stroller's protective plastic flap. Little Ignacio, who's almost 2 years old, often appears in the frame with a…

Read more…

As part of the Light Festival in Gent, going on from now until February 1, artist Klaus Obermaier is presenting Dancing House, an interactive projection mapping and sound installation that lets people distort a house based on their movement. While standing in front of the building on which the projection is displayed, visitors are encouraged to sway or move their arms back and forth as their bodies change the look of the building's facade. Watch as visitors make the building crumble or simulate the look and sound of wind. This video was taken at the Nuit Blanche in Kosice, Slovakia in 2014.

This will be the third light festival for Ghent, Belgium. Obermaier is only one of 44 different light artists that are showing their art this year. In previous years, the light festival welcomed over half a million visitors.…

Read more…

There are several aspects of Disney films that don't quite match up to reality, from talking animals to unbelievably tiny waistlines to magic spells. Noticing that Disney princesses' hair often behaves in ways that are just as fantastical as the characters' lives, BuzzFeed illustrator Loryn Brantz decided to depict what our favorite animated heroines would look like with hair more true to life.

Brantz's humorously retouched images depict everyday hair problems that we can all relate to. Instead of having perfectly flowing locks that remain flawless all the time, these Disney princesses battle bed head, static, undyed roots, and much more in this hilarious series.

Above: Ariel with wet hair

Belle with hair stuck to her lip gloss…


Read more…

If you work in an office, you might’ve heard how important it is to stay active during the day. Remaining sedentary - whether it’s in a standing or sitting position - can be bad for your health. The Stir Kinetic Desk helps you get moving with a simple gesture. It adjusts itself up and down to shift between the two positions. You just tell the desk what portion of the day that you want to stand or sit, and it prompts you to do so. When you haven’t stood for a while, Stir will remind you by slightly moving the table up and down as you work.

Stir has a built-in touchscreen that allows you to look up statistics, set preferences, and tell it to move. This desk also learns more about you as time goes on. It recognizes your patterns and will prompt you to stand when you’re most likely to want to. An account that’s linked to your FitBit also keeps track of your preferences, which means that you can…

Read more…

Stunning Photos of the Coldest City in the World

What does it look like in the coldest city in the world? Thanks to one New Zealand photographer named Amos Chapple, we won't just have to wonder. Oymyakon, Russia is the coldest place on earth where humans actually live. The small, rural town has brutal winters where temperatures can dip to minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit. The area is six time zones away from Moscow. You wouldn't guess it but neighboring Yakutsk is an economically vibrant place, mostly due to the abundance of natural resources around it, like diamonds, oil and gas. That makes it an expensive place to live in and visit.

When Chapple arrived in Oymyakon, he was struck by the emptiness of the place. The population stands at about 500 permanent residents. As he told Smithsonian, "The streets were just…

Read more…

Touching Figurative Paintings of Women by Amy Lind

Amy Lind’s figurative paintings offer beautiful representations of women dressed in captivating, feminine styles. The artist casts her subjects in soft colors and filtered light to showcase their gentle, realistic expressions. The styles exhibited by the subjects jump across decades to highlight the best of different beauty trends. Rosy cheeks and soft, voluminous hair popular at the turn of the century show up on some models. The sheath dresses and bobbed hair of the roaring ‘20s and more modern-looking styles with a classic twist (such as a tank top and flower crown) also make appearances. Flowers are a theme Lind gravitates towards, as many of her subjects are either wearing flowers or are surrounded by them.

The Savannah-based artist modifies her painting style depending on what era she wants to evoke. Some portraits feature clearer,…

Read more…

Jenna Martin constructs alternate, dreamlike realities through her conceptual photography. Inspired by films and storytelling, the Montana-based creative takes advantage of her mountainous, serene surroundings to capture elaborate portraits that truly come to life after seamlessly blending different components together in post-processing.

In one spectacular image, dozens of flowers encased in bubbles gently drift around a young woman in an evocation of spring. Another photo depicts a figure dressed in white perched atop a half-sunken car, playing a serenade on her violin to an unseen audience. Both conceptual portraits encapsulate the signature elements of Martin's work—imaginative, solitary, and filled with a touch of surreal wonder that hints at a larger narrative.…

Read more…

Enchanting Macro Photos of Wet Ladybugs by Tomasz Skoczen

Glistening with rain or dew, these ladybugs look absolutely enchanting in these macro photos by Ireland-based photographer Tomasz Skoczen. For years now, he's been capturing these black and red winged insects as they're walking through grass or landing on flowers. Taken mostly in the garden of his backyard, he uses his Canon 5D Mark II and his macro lens to shoot these insects in their natural state.

Skoczen has learned a great deal about ladybugs, or ladybirds as they're often called. "They can be found all year round if you know where to look, and they can be very fast and therefore difficult to shoot. There are over five thousand species in the family in which the ladybird belongs. They are small, between .8 and 18 millimeters and they display a range of colors including red, orange, and yellow. Their covers are striped, spotted in black, or they can have no markings at…

Read more…

In Bea Crespo and Andrea G. Portoles’ delightful “Brunchcity” series, paper dioramas form iconic skylines that pop out of foods for which major cities are famous. Crespo, an illustrator, created the charming drawings, selecting and sketching landmarks that represent each city. For example, the ruins of Athens' Parthenon rises out of a dish of Greek yogurt, Cuba's capital building and a mural of Che Guevera stand on a bedrock of beans and rice, and a paper Coliseum teeters on the side of an Italian ice cream cone. Portoles, a photographer, captured the pop-up-bookish displays against often-pastel backgrounds in artistic lighting to show off the details in each piece. The artists turned out a new photo every two weeks beginning in 2013, when they started the project.

They say the series was a fun way to combine their passions. “This…is the result of things we enjoy the most: food,…

Read more…

While Ray Villafane is best known for his expertise in the art of food carving, he is also recognized for his magnificent, remarkably realistic sand sculptures. Using just sand and water, the artist sculpts incredibly detailed figures that tower above him as he works. Funny-faced people, nativity scenes, and hellish creatures from Dante's Inferno appear so lifelike that it's hard to believe they were formed from humble grains of sand.

Villafane only began sand sculpting in 2008 after accepting a challenge in Jesolo, Italy. Despite not having any experience working with the medium, he wowed viewers with his exceptional craft, and since then has received invitations from all over…

Read more…

Adventurous travelers can now direct their wanderlust towards Airbnb’s daring, redesigned cable car-turned-luxury accommodation. It’s suspended in midair above the Courcheval ski resort in the French Alps. But, before you book your plane ticket, know that it’s not available for just anyone to rent. The gorgeous room is actually a grand prize in the site’s latest competition.

This cable car hangs over 2,700 meters above sea level and is near the top of the Sommet de la Saulire, which is a mountain in the Massif de la Vanoise. Airbnb transformed it into a stunning one bedroom, two bed-apartment that can host up to four guests at a time.

The precarious setting is part of Airbnb’s “A Night At” initiative that awards 24-hour getaways to one-of-a-kind locations. Previous destinations included a commercial jet and an IKEA. Here, the winners will be chauffeured up to the…

Read more…

This past November, nestled under London’s A13 highway, was an mysterious glowing orb that invited visitors to crawl inside and take a look. It was called Osmo and was designed by the London studio Loop.pH as part of the city’s annual Light Night Canning Town. The project featured a pneumatically-inflated cocoon fashioned from silver mylar, and its viewers could pass through the zip-up entrance and sit beneath the stars in a brilliant, all-encompassing setting.

Loop.pH projected the galaxy onto a 29-foot-high surface with lasers and based it on the actual night sky. They used this map from In the Sky, which charts 88 constellations onto a 2D rectangular map. So, the designers had the challenge of projecting something flat onto…

Read more…

Photographer Captures an Eerily Empty New York City

It was suppose to be the snow storm that paralyzed New York City, but it in the end it turned out to be a bust. Still, a few days ago, everyone cleared out, making it the perfect place to shoot a rarely ever empty New York City. Who else was there on hand but photographer Vivienne Gucwa, a native New Yorker who, for nearly a decade, has been capturing the energy of the city through her lens? She's behind the recently released NY Through the Lens, a 192 paperback book that Yahoo News described as "filled with beautiful images that capture the color, vibrancy, artistry and uniqueness of New York City."

We got in touch with Vivienne to ask her what it was like to shoot New York City during this snow storm. "What made this storm stand out versus other storms was that there was a ban…

Read more…

In his macro photo series Amazing Worlds Within Our World, artist Pyanek demonstrates the enormous complexity of everyday objects. Through the modified Canon T3i lens, squiggly fibers in book pages come into sharp focus, dramatic pit marks on the tip of a matchstick become visible, and beautiful green and gold streaks in the metal of a common screw jump out. To produce the images, the artist took multiple exposures with different focus points and stacked the frames, editing them in Adobe Lightroom and Exposure 5.

Pyanek’s project calls attention to stunning details hidden on the surface of common items. It suggests beauty is hidden in the everyday, available to those who will take the time to look closely enough.

Above: Grain of White Sugar

Book…
Read more…

Spanish artist Ignacio Canales Aracil uses the art of pressing flowers to craft spectacular sculptures that resemble hollow vessels. Starting with a large, cone-shaped mold, Aracil weaves hand-picked blooms into a flat, floral overlay that can take up to a month to dry. The pieces are sprayed with a light coating of varnish to protect them from moisture. The final products are incredibly delicate, yet rigid, works of art that glorify the beauty of spring and fresh life frozen in time.

"Ignacio presents an accesible and intimate work that celebrates spring and keeps it," the artist's press release reads. "His work explores the meanings of nature and flowers with shapes that capture their beauty in sculptures where life is held. His…

Read more…

On Monday, the world held its breath as the news reported that New York City would be hit with one of the largest blizzards in the city's history. Forecasters predicted for up to 30 inches of snow. The city came to a standstill as thousands of flights were canceled, the subway system was shut down, and drivers were ordered off the road. The National Weather Service later said that the storm had moved farther east than predicated. Meteorologists downgraded the system from a blizzard to a winter storm. New York still ended up with about six inches of snow, a normal January snowfall.

A few New York City photographers like Vivienne Gucwa and Anthony Quintano (seen here) braved the blizzard warning and…

Read more…

Before Stanley Kubrick rose to fame as the acclaimed director of films like 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, and The Shining, he worked as a photographer for Look magazine at the young age of 17. After starting out doing freelance work, Kubrick joined the photographic department as the youngest staff member. With a keen eye for aesthetics and a natural sense for visual storytelling, he produced the highest number of published articles of any photographer for the magazine from 1945 to 1950.

Among those published stories was Life and Love on the New York City Subway, a series of striking photos depicting passengers on their daily commutes in the lifeline of the city. Shot in 1946 over the course of two weeks,…

Read more…

Subscribe to our mailing list