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Founder of Picture This, Jaimee Newberry, has just made every young fashion designer's dream come true. The company, which officially launched last week, turns children's drawings into actual clothing so they can "wear their imagination." The idea came to Newberry, a mother of two daughters, when she sewed a dress for her youngest based on the girl's doodles. Newberry tells Babble that the dress was greatly admired by both her daughter's friends and their parents, which led her to think about how she could turn this into…

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When you visit an art museum, the people watching is an added bonus to the incredible creativity that lines the walls. From afar, Karin Jurick observes patrons as they intently look at iconic artworks, capturing these moments with her camera. She later paints both the people and the pieces that captivated their attention for her voyeuristic series called Museum Patrons.

Jurick’s concept has her recreate some of the world’s most renowned paintings like Gustav Klimt’s The Kiss and Vincent van Gogh’s Starry Night. These prized works are treated with the same attention to detail as the passerbys, whose attitudes are the most compelling part of Museum Patrons. Their body language demonstrates how they prefer to observe the art, and everyone has a slightly different style. Some lean into the…

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For Annie Vought, writing represents an emotional revelation of the inner self. She renders that delicate relationship between words and personal identity in her intricate, hand-cut art. Using an X-acto knife, Vought slices tiny typography into large paper sheets, creating carefully coiled lexicons and newly labyrinthian replicas of found notes.

In an interview with the Art Museum of Sonoma County, Vought explains the significance that attracts her to inscribed language: “In the penmanship, word choice, and spelling the author is revealed in spite of him/herself. A letter is physical confirmation of who we were at the moment it was written, or all we have left of a person or a period of time. I also think…

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When Susannah Benjamin was just 11 years old, she fell in love with photography and put all of her energy into learning how to tell stories with her point-and-shoot Kodak camera. During her time in college at Yale, Susannah focused her education on French and English Literature to understand how the masters developed characters among the pages of text from which she would draw inspiration.

Susannah has since developed a mysterious and often minimalist style with concept-focused images that feature the dark and mysterious New England landscape she calls home. We were grateful for the opportunity to catch up with Susannah for a Behind The Lens look into her mysterious photography!

You started photography at the young age of 11, can…

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New York-based photographer Omar Robles is well known for his dedication to photographing elegant ballerinas against harsh urban backgrounds. Recently though, he was able to pursue a dream of his when he received an opportunity to travel to Cuba and shoot some of the top-ranked national dancers who live there. His project evolved unexpectedly during the visit, as Robles was simultaneously inspired by the amazing dance skills of these performers and “the cadence of the Cubans in the streets” who struggle to strike a balance from day to day.

Robles’s characteristic urban dance shots capture the beauty and grace of trained athletes who are able to make grand movements look effortless. Robles came to Cuba already expecting to be blown away by the talent, but what he wasn't prepared for was the extreme levels of poverty…

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Earlier this month, we fell in love with the heartwarming story of Dion Leonard and his dog, Gobi. Leonard, an ultra-marathoner, had been running in a 4-day race across the Gobi desert, when he was joined halfway through by an adorable stray dog. The aptly named pup, Gobi, never left Leonard's side, which formed the beginning of a beautiful friendship. Unfortunately, pet visas are extremely difficult to obtain and Leonard, who resides in Scotland, needed to leave Gobi behind with a friend in China in order to work out the paperwork. If all went well, Leonard expected it to be Christmastime when he and his canine pal would reunite for good.

However, on August 15th, Leonard received word that…

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The dodo bird has been long extinct, but it still has relatives living in the world today. Known as the Nicobar pigeon, this rare creature is the closest living connection to the famous flightless bird, although the two don’t look alike. One striking difference is the Nicobar pigeon’s vibrant plumage that shines in iridescent blues, coppers, and greens—in addition to its reddish legs and small white tail. This colorful characteristic developed because of their location; the bird has long been isolated on small islands and lacked natural predators. Because there’s no need to conceal themselves, they were able to develop the brilliant feathers.

The Nicobar pigeon resides in Southeast Asia and the Pacific, from the Indian Nicobar Islands eastward to places like Thailand and Papua New Guinea. Although its exact population count…

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For a few fleeting days earlier this August, an exquisite ephemeral carpet of fresh flowers graced the cobblestone at Grand Place, the central square in Brussels, Belgium. Spanning 75 meters long and 24 meters wide, it consisted of 1,800 square meters of begonias carefully interspersed with dahlias, grasses, and bark, with each square meter containing about 300 blooms. Together, the bright blossoms rendered an elegant tapestry of Japanese-inspired motifs, appearing from a distance like a magnificently vibrant woven rug.

The creation was the 20th iteration in a bi-annual tradition, launched back in 1971 and displayed at the Grand Place since 1986. Every other year on August 15th, Belgian nonprofit Tapis de Fleur has assembled a group of professional artists (including illustrators, graphic designers, and landscape architects) to develop a large-scale floral design around a…

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Did you know that in Morocco, goats climb trees? Farmers actually support and cultivate this bizarre agricultural technique and release their herds to climb and gorge on fruit. Note that these are not just any trees, though. These are the much sought-after but rare Argania trees, which are thankfully now protected after years of over-farming and clear-cutting. While the tree itself is a thick, gnarly mess of branches and thorns, it annually produces a semi-sweet pulpy fruit that surrounds a hard nut. Only after the fruit is fully mature are the goats let loose to feast. One of the greatest benefits of the goats' climbing habits is found in their droppings. The eaten fruit and nuts are processed and converted into seeds, traditionally used by locals to create Argan Oil, which is now exported around the world as a cult beauty product. Today, products such as …

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When the administrators of Michigan's East Kentwood High School told students to "get creative" with their school ID photos, no one was expecting the humorous idea that 17-year-old, Tyra Hunt, decided to do. The high school senior tells Buzzfeed News that her kindergarten photo sits on her family's living room mantle, and has become something of a joke. The photograph shows a young Hunt—who apparently didn't want to take the picture—with crinkled eyebrows and an unnerved mouth. To best show off her transformation from age 5 to age 17, Hunt decided to style her hair in matching pigtails and planned to squish her face into a similar anxious expression. Then she found…

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If a halved avocado could talk, what would it say? According to illustrator Charly Clements, it’d admit, “I feel so empty inside.” Through her clever series Real Life Lines, Clements has imagined what the buttery fruit and other inanimate objects would utter if given the chance. She brings them to life with simple lines and handwritten text on photographs that convey these candid thoughts. Amusing in tone, the cartoonish characters express many of the emotions that we humans have, like feelings of joy or distress. And much to our delight, Clements works in pun-laced phrases whenever possible.

Real Life Lines is an Instagram-based project. Aside from being lighthearted and charming, it has another purpose. Every image—and the subjects of Clement’s illustrations—are linked back to the people who…

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The watermelons you buy from grocery stores are typically plucked from vines which produce only 2-4 fruits. However, an extraordinary super-plant in Xinzheng, Hunan Province, China has just yielded an incredible 131 watermelons! Stemming from a centralized root, the fruits branch out and form a family circle. While the amount of fruits itself is impressive, equally so are the fruits' sizes and weights. The melons' weights range from 5 kg to 19 kg (about 11 to 41 pounds). Quality did not suffer given the large quantity.

The engineered seed was produced by agricultural tech firm, Zhengzhou Research Seedling Technology Co., Ltd, and was planted in late April. It took only about 90 days for the seeds to sprout these enormous melons in July. According to head agronomist, Zhu Xuegang, the plant has a high disease resistance and a capacity to thrive in sandy…

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Russian photographer Ivan Hafizov is on a mission of historic preservation. For many centuries, Russia has prided itself on its intricate woodworking called nalichniki. The craft was used particularly to decorate window casings—the trim molding that originates at the windowsill and wraps up and around the glass—creating a dainty border. Although the exact reason for this tradition isn't clear, window decorating may have started in pagan times and were designed to protect a home's inhabitants from evil spirits. Due to wars, house abandonment or damage, and fragility of wood, these beautifully ornate designs are becoming quickly endangered. That's why Hafizov aims to salvage the memory of these beautifully designed works of architectural art with his camera. 

For the past few…

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Coasters are often a forgettable part of home decor, but ThinkGeek has created a set that’ll make you eager to set down your drink. Unlike many tiny trays, their Radioactive Elements Coasters come with a playful bonus feature: they light up when touched. Pressure sensitive, they glow bright colors as your favorite beverage graces their surface. This adds some glitz to your decor, and it’s perfect for parties, too—guests will easily remember what shining element is theirs.

When not in use, the coaster set offers trivia about Radium, Plutonium, Uranium, and Thorium. Each square is modeled from the Periodic Table and displays the name, atomic number, as well as the isotopic mass of the most stable (or common) isotope. All of the radioactive elements are technically unstable, but unlike their namesakes,…

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For 113 days straight, Costa Rica has generated 100 percent of its electricity from renewable sources. The country already set a record last year for its 99% green energy production, forgoing fossil fuels for a total of 285 days; now, the nation’s next goal is to maintain its current streak for an entire year.

That ambition may sound lofty, but it's likely to succeed and to remain a steady trend as the years go on. Costa Rica’s climate allows access to a number of green power sources: its tropical rainfalls and extensive rivers lend themselves to hydroelectricity. Additionally, its solar, wind, biomass, and geothermal sources are ample, too. Precipitation is predicted to increase over time, and the country has substantially invested in geothermal energy initiatives.

Though often seen as an idyllic oasis, the lush landscape is a true testament to the powerful…

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Look closely at Tom Eckert’s artwork because things are not what they seem. His effortlessly-draped fabrics and their gentle folds are not meticulously-styled photographs, but sculptures that have been crafted from wood. Using traditional techniques to carve, construct, and paint his life-sized pieces, they appear light and airy, like a gentle breeze could dismantle their arrangement. But, Eckert assures us the opposite and chooses woods that are known for their stability—helping to further his impressive illusions.

Eckert’s interest in fooling the eye dates back to his youth. “Since childhood,” he explains, “I have been curious about and amused by mistaken impressions of reality presented as part of…

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In the aftermath of the Rio Olympic Games, Team Great Britain—which brought home 67 medals and finished second overall—faced their biggest challenge yet: finding their luggage. Each of the 366-strong Team GB members carried identical red luggage to the Games, causing great confusion at the Heathrow baggage claim, as athletes spent tedious hours searching through bag after bag. "Mine's the red one!!" says a humorous tweet by windsurfer Nick Dempsey

Through the unfortunate process, the team managed to keep a light and playful attitude. Many athletes tweeted videos and photos that are quite entertaining. Rower…

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Earlier this year, Ola Shekhtman inspired our sense of wanderlust with her gorgeous rings featuring beloved cityscapes from around the world. The intricate gold, platinum, and sterling silver accessories—produced with 3D printing technology—took us to places like New York City, London, Hong Kong, and Berlin, as each exquisite ring depicted defining characteristics of the chosen place.

Shekhtman has continued to create her quirky statement rings and added more iconic skylines. The famous Hollywood sign is featured in her Los Angeles band, the Colosseum is prominently displayed for Rome, and La Sagrada Família is an unmistakable fixture for Barcelona. Each piece includes several areas of interest within the circular composition and allows you to wear the city in slightly…

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For many new parents, a baby’s fleeting moments of slumber are a valuable opportunity to play catch-up on their own lives: work, cleaning, and most importantly, sleep. Photographer Laura Izumikawa Choi uses her daughter Joey’s nap time as a way to exercise her own creativity. While Joey lays peacefully in her crib, Choi transforms her into a bevy of different celebrities and colorful characters.

Using wigs, stuffed animals, and even waffles, Choi dresses Joey in costumes that celebrate popular culture. Television, music, and sporting events are her guide as Joey becomes miniature versions of Beyoncé, Pikachu, and Han Solo, as well as Eleven from Stranger Things and Ariel from The Little Mermaid. Every tiny garment and baby-sized prop looks adorable on Joey, who impressively stays asleep during…

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Photographer Daan Verhoeven is well-adjusted to diving deep underwater. He typically forgoes the use of a scuba tank so he can plunge below 40 meters without cumbersome gear—except for his camera, which he uses to shoot submerged portraits and entrancing images of the typically unseen ocean floor. However, his newest series has a bit more of a playful bent: Verhoeven captured people's shocked reactions as they dunked into a small pool regulated at 4°C (39°F), just a handful of degrees above freezing.

Verhoeven stumbled upon the nearly-icy setting at the freediving world championships in Turku, Finland. It was located adjacent to the main 50-meter pool, hardly larger than a bathtub. He dared to dip in, but says the effect was staggering: his sinuses froze and his feet started to cramp as he crawled his…

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