All Posts (16880)

99-year-old Lillian Weber has a generous heart and sewing hands that just won't stop. The Iowa-based woman spends hours every single day making a dress for small children who receive the clothing through the Christian nonprofit group Little Dresses for Africa.

For the past two years, Weber has made more than 840 dresses because, simply stated, she just wanted to help people. She uses a pattern to make the dress but she doesn't stop there. She adds a few personal touches to each garment in order to make the items more unique and so that no two dresses are alike. Weber's goal is to continue sewing 150 more dresses so that she can create her 1,000th dress by the time she turns 100 years old next May. “When I get to that thousand, if I’m able to, I won’t quit," she recently said. "I’ll go at it…

Read more…

At first glance the sculptures constructed by artist Li Hongbo appear to be chiseled out of stone, but once manipulated and pulled, they reveal the use of a different medium. Once the viewer uncovers that the sculpture can not only move, but stretch, spread, twist, bend, and contract, the pieces exhibit a much greater impact. 

Hongbo first developed an interest in paper when he worked in the book publishing business. He recognized the vitalness of paper in the design of a book, analyzing the characteristics and durability of the different types. He adopted the “paper gourd” method, which is commonly recognized from paper lanterns. 

Once Hongbo discovered connecting paper, endless possibilities unfurled. He adopted a layering process, which takes months to complete, and carefully considers the…

Read more…

It’s common to see audio speakers that are sitting on a desk or attached to a wall for surround sound. OM Audio's OM/ONE breaks away from such conventions, however, and looks positively futuristic. It has a very distinctive attribute - it floats! The innovative product features a 3.6 inch levitating driver (about the size of a tennis ball) that hovers above its base at a height of about 1.2 inches thanks to an electromagnet. The “isolation” style speaker means that it will prevent audio distortion because it’s separated from its stand and won’t have anything blocking the waves.

In addition to this eye-catching feature, the rechargeable OM/ONE connects wirelessly to mobile devices and computers using Bluetooth, and has a range of up to 33 feet. It can be used in pairs for stereo sound, and each unit is capable of producing 100 decibels for up to 15 hours of…

Read more…

An influential figure in the urban art scene, British artist Nick Gentry continues to create intriguing images using floppy discs and vintage film negatives. Consumption, innovation, and technology are all themes that resonate within his artwork. 

Gentry constructs canvases from floppy discs that he embellishes with oil paint and shadowy undertones, leading the focus to the chilling eyes within the illustrations. For his other portraits, he layers negatives to showcase the contrast and shape of the faces, creating emphasis to the overall image and each undeveloped print.

He chronicles historical media that once played a vital role in modern technology and has outlasted its purpose. Gentry voices that, “Today we go…

Read more…

Using the human body as her canvas, artist Gesine Marwedel creates amazing works of body art that will have you staring in awe. The artist draws upon the shape of a person's twisted body, head, and limbs to produce intricate optical illusions that appear to be landscapes, animals, and all sorts of elaborate designs.

At first glance, many of the compositions, which are set against solid black or white backgrounds, appear to be traditional paintings. It's only upon closer inspection that the muscles of an arm or the folds of a leg reveal themselves to the viewer.

The artist says, "Bodypainting is not only inking on a living canvas; it is the recording of body shapes in the design, painting on and with the body. It is the transformation of a man into a breathing, moving, living work of art."…

Read more…

This photo series is an inspiring story of a mother's love. Photographer Holly Spring's young daughter struggled early in life with Hirschsprung’s Disease and has only one hand, but Spring won't let that stop her from living life to the fullest. This collection of photographs was Spring's way of encouraging her daughter and showing her that life doesn't have to be filled with limitations.

The imaginative series features the beautiful young girl in strikingly enchanting scenes that feel like a fairytale. The unique compositions are often digitally composed to create a magical story. The artist explains, "I love that ideas can flow from something as simple as a pose, or direction of light. Many of my compositions are put together with elements shot at different times of the year. They are like best friends who have yet to meet! Holding it all together is a moment - a look from my…

Read more…

What does 200 calories worth of food look like? The website Wisegeek conducted a study of 71 different edibles to find out. They proportioned things like peanut butter, canned beans, fruits, veggies, and even soda into 200 calorie quantities and photographed the results. It’s surprising to see what this actually looks like when on a plate.

Some foods, like candy, are high in calories compared to their size. You couldn’t have that many jelly beans if you were trying to stay under the 200 mark, but you could easily eat a plateful of broccoli.

Seeing these differences is eye-opening; perhaps it will make you reconsider the next time you’re craving a sugary snack. If we think of calories like currency, the choice should be easy. L.S. Wynn, an author in the study, writes, “According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the average adult needs to consume about 2000 - 2500…

Read more…


In his first solo exhibition Riverbed, Olafur Eliasson assembled a landscape of stone and soil that conceals the normally tiled floor of the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Denmark, to emulate a natural rugged terrain. 

Viewers are given the opportunity to become immersed in the authenticity of the art installation, and thoughtfully ponder the contrasting dissimilarities of the exhibit and the outside world. 

“What I’m interested in with my work at the Louisiana isn’t really that you experience an object or an artwork,” says Eliasson.  "I am interested in how you connect this landscape to the rest of the world and ultimately, how you experience yourself within…

Read more…

For German designer Christoph Bader, the central theme of his project is based on processes that create shapes and patterns, resulting in artwork that look anything but digital. Limm is a series that, at first glance, appears to be elaborate patterns of string, but are actually constructed on a computer. 

The pictures begin as an algorithm or set of rules that trace a force field and produce a three-dimensional model of wires, which are rendered in an application. The results are captivating images with hyper-realistic shadows and lighting. 

The possibilities of the visual outcomes are infinite, which is lucky for those who admire Bader’s work, since he has created something truly exquisite. …

Read more…

Rome-based nature and wildlife photographer Simone Sbaraglia ventured to The Netherlands to document the billions of magnificent tulips for which the country is known. He rented a plane to take him high above the fields in order to transform the flowers into magically captivating abstractions filled with vibrant colors and patterns. From such a high aerial view, the dynamic streaks look more like bold strokes of paint across a canvas rather than what they really are—rows and rows of delicate little tulips.

By eliminating any human presence within the photos, Sbaraglia created breathtaking landscapes that remind viewers of the beauty of nature. "I am especially drawn to the geometry and colors, so I loved the harmony of the tulip fields from an aerial view," explained…

Read more…

Instead of using the typical watercolors to create his paintings, Baghdad-based artist Othman Toma uses all kinds of delicious, melting treats as his medium. While the chocolate ice cream bars and colorful popsicles begin to melt, Toma scoops up the liquid with his brushes and begins to paint.

The clever collection of work includes lions and tigers bursting from splatters, and minimalist portraits peeking out from the page. Toma is able to obtain an incredibly wide array of saturated colors without requiring very many materials. He simply has to go to the freezer! When photographing the piece, he includes the uneaten ice cream and his brushes as a part of the composition. In doing so, he offers his viewers a small glimpse into his process of transforming the food into beautiful artwork.

Creating artwork with a unique medium requires a lot of planning and forethought,…

Read more…

Dutch designer Robert Kolenik has turned the innocuous kitchen island into a source of oceanic wonder. Combining the furniture’s typical function with an aquarium, you can now prepare dinner while admiring swimming fish below. Kolenik calls his creation Ocean Kitchen, and it’s a great way to add a unique ambiance to any dining area.

The large aquarium is topped with an L-shaped slab of Corian that effortlessly lifts up at the press of a button, giving you access to the top of the tank. And while the piece may look minimal, the Ocean Kitchen comes complete with hidden storage that helps keep your space organized. Each aquarium is limited edition and customized based on where it’s installed. For fans of tropical fish, this could be the perfect addition to your home.

Robert…

Read more…

As football season approaches, it’s becoming time for a fan-favorite activity - fantasy football. Maybe you’re playing it just for fun, but for Henry Stern and his friends, getting last in their league means a punishment. Stern, last season’s loser, had to put together a calendar of himself recreating famous moments in pop culture. The results are embarrassingly hilarious!

Each month features Stern’s face Photoshopped onto the body of a celebrity or fictitious character. Some scenes are older, like January’s recreation of George Costanza from Seinfeld, or September’s “Marilyn Monroe” skirt flutter. But he also pays homage to more recent events, like Miley Cyrus’ “Wrecking Ball” music video for March. The valuable lesson here is that if you play in a fantasy football league, make sure you know all of the rules first.…

Read more…

Methodically placing food in accordance to color, Emily Blincoe finds inspiration from shapes, colors, light, and everyday objects. Previously we admired The Garden Collection and Sugar Series, where Blincoe demonstrated her skill of arranging shrubbery and nostalgic candy in the same fashion. 

Her vibrant series, Colors Organized Neatly, evokes a lively collection of prints that creates intrigue with objects most would find nothing more than ordinary. Her motive seems simple enough, but there is something astonishingly satisfying about how she thoughtfully arranges the colorful foods. Her series is aesthetically…

Read more…

While we might often dismiss the chin in our daily beauty routine, London-based makeup artist Laura Jenkinson highlights hers in a humorous tribute to cartoon personalities. She paints characters from Disney movies, Looney Tunes, South Park, and more onto her chin, lips, and the skin above them. This cleverly transforms Jenkinson’s mouth into a figure’s over-sized mouth, and when she moves her lips it looks like the character is talking.

The makeup artist is skilled at applying her colorful cosmetics; she can make her human lips appear like they're totally natural on these characters. To add to the believably, she’ll also imitate their grin or teeth. While some have a full set of pearly whites, others only have a couple of front chompers. Jenkinson will curl her lips just so to hide her real teeth, and in a case like Bugs Bunny, expose her fake…

Read more…

Forget about New York Fashion Week or the Paris runway. In Sydney, Australia, well-dressed ducks steal the scene at the Sydney Royal Easter Show. It’s here that the waterfowl are outfitted in elegant pink, green and yellow gowns, and even have tiny matching hats, too! They waddle down the catwalk at the Pied Piper Duck Show, and the adorable sight is considered one of the highlights of the annual event, which overall attracts an average of 900,000 visitors.

Brian Harrington, a quirky Australian farmer, is the man behind the fashion show. He’s run it for the past three decades, and works with a professional dressmaker who individually styles each duck to a theme or era. They’ve covered daywear, evening attire, bridal outfits, and more. Currently, they’re showcasing costumes from the 1800’s era as well as favorites from the past.

Haute couture isn’t the only…

Read more…

The next time you walk into a conference room, don't be surprised if you are seated at a table made out of an old jet engine! This impressive 747 Cowling Conference Table design, created by Southern California company MotoArt, features recycled plane parts as the foundation for the modern, sleek piece of furniture. Having this as the centerpiece for a meeting would be an impressive addition to any modern office and would certainly be the topic of conversation around the room.

The base of the 12-foot wide, circular conference table is a polished jet engine set on its side. In addition to seating 12 people, the beautiful design has the option of having data ports to charge any device. A spun aluminum dome points upward and serves as the central point to hold a large, 1/2" thick glass table top. Bright LED lights illuminate the center of the engine to add a little flair…

Read more…

Masks is a funny project in which French artist Junior Fritz Jacquet took plain old toilet paper rolls and transformed them into expressive abstract faces. The squished up faces are both a little bit odd and a little bit adorable. To create each one, Jacquet first sculpted the cardboard into the desired shapes. He then coated them with a shellac and sometimes a pigment to add a touch of color to the playful characters.

From a very young age, Jacquet has been fascinated with paper and this passion comes through in his work. According to his bio, "He explores and experiments with folding and crumpling techniques, innovating, with his fingers, methods still undiscovered to create forms and craft poetic objects that visually enhance any surrounding." Everything that Jacquet makes is inspired by the traditional paper folding art form of origami but he chooses to use more than…

Read more…

Using only a simple, dark background, Vincent J. Musi captures the elegance of lions, leopards, tigers, and more. The South Carolina-based photographer works for National Geographic and shot these breathtaking images as part of a series titled Big Cats. His photos showcase incredible, up-close details that we don’t…

Read more…

With a unique combination of Western graffiti styles and traditional Chinese art, 23-year old Chen Yingjie, aka Hua Tunan, is making a name for himself as one of the leading forces in the realm of street art. His work demonstrates his exploration of remarkable ways to combine two seemingly different styles with elements that include ink painting, drum rhythms, and a variety of cultural symbols. 

Splatter Ink Cheetah is grand in scale and incredibly detailed, combining traditional Chinese ink methods and Western art graffiti by splattering ink, adding complexity and richness to the breathtaking image. The colors come to life, almost mimicking the wild and unpredictable nature of his subject. 

Tunan is a core member of the…

Read more…