All Posts (18603)

Artist Jonathan Whitfill blends literature and art in the form of book wheel sculptures that will make you stop, stare, and maybe even read along. Whitfill gives new life to old books for his Shredder series, producing layered pieces that give off an aura of sophistication. Since many of these literary specimens display titles, library stamps, and various book pages, this also provides onlookers with the opportunity to explore the fine, antique details as they admire a nearly obsolete medium.

To create these magnificent sculptures, Whitfill starts by cutting out pages from each of the repurposed books, in order to form wedges that will fit together in a wheel formation. The books themselves are encased in a protective resin and, after being manipulated, they are secured to a…

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In an ambitious series titled Playground, photographer James Mollison documents places around the world where children laugh, cry, and run around until they're exhausted. Mollison, who previously explored where kids sleep, traveled to locales like Nairobi, Tokyo, and Los Angeles to capture these images.

There's an incredible amount of diversity among the playgrounds. Often, they are devoid of jungle gyms and swing sets, opting for large, open spaces instead. Some places contain grassy fields while others are built on dirt. Mollison also includes backdrops of dense cityscapes, palm trees, and mountains, proving that play can be anywhere.

The photographer's inspiration for Playground came from…

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On his way to work in the morning, street artist Mobstr would cycle past an average, graffiti-covered red wall in London. For years, he noticed that a city worker would paint over the graffiti with red paint, when it was below a certain line. For any graffiti above this predetermined line, the steadfast laborer would pressure-wash it off. "This prompted the start of an experiment," wrote Mobstr on his website.

Over the course of a year, the artist graffitied the wall, waited for the worker to remove it, and repeated this cat-and-mouse game over and over again. Along the way, these two individuals went through several playful exchanges that culminated into one interesting, visual story with a satisfying end. Take a look at the images, below, of Mobstr's…

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Artist Russell Powell creates stunningly realistic portraits on an unconventional surface - his own hand. The California-based teacher merges art and the body by painting eye-catching depictions of people on his palms. Incredibly, this textured and creased surface doesn’t deter him from adding intricate details and dramatic shading that gives the paintings a three-dimensional feel.

Powell’s works don’t just stay on his hands. Once he has completed a portrait, he touches his palm to paper. This process is called “hand-stamping,” and it’s how the artist records his pieces in a permanent way. He’s able to paint quickly enough that the medium doesn’t dry, meaning that his works are clearly imprinted. In addition, the stamping showcases Powell’s unique fingerprints and will always remind us from where…

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Swedish artist Susanna Hesselberg recently constructed a library that plunges into an infinite abyss. Visible only from above ground, the intriguing installation is inconspicuously marked and, from a distance, looks as though it's just a square frame laying on the grass. As viewers approach it, however, they can easily see the stacks of books descending into the earth. Its compact structure is reminiscent of a mining shaft or water well with no apparent bottom.

The realization that these texts can't actually be reached and retrieved also laces the tunnel in mystery and a certain sense of foreboding. Even the title of Hesselberg’s installation, When My Father Died It Was Like a Whole Library Had Burned Down, alludes to feelings of loss and ways of mourning. In fact,…

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Using canvases of all different dimensions, artist Michael Zavros is able to paint incredibly meticulous works of art. From paintings that can be held in the palm of your hand to those that are larger than the average human being, Zavros has tackled it all. But no matter what the artwork's size is, his work is always impeccably detailed to the point where it is reminiscent of a photograph.

With oil paints and a detail brush in hand, the painter creates short, precise brushstrokes that are barely visible. His technique is especially effective within the detailed paintings of horses and dogs, whose fur appear to blend seamlessly together. When it comes portraying the human figure, the artist flawlessly creates visual harmony in the way he captures the minute glimpses or larger-than-life…

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Rice farmers in China have carefully planted their harvest to create vast 3D works of art that are both eye-catching displays of contemporary and traditional subjects. These plant-based pieces are so intricate that they look as though they were spray-painted onto the fields. In reality, the spectacular designs were actually planned out ahead of time, utilizing rice saplings that grow to be different heights and colors. Knowing the growth patterns of each species of the crops allowed farmers to form beautiful images of detailed scenes, animals, and classic Chinese deities, months in advance.

Each year, the rice farmers are entrusted with the task of utilizing these local fields to grow different patterns, so that tourists will be inclined to visit China's northeast province of Liaoning. While this region is home to a Chinese ethnic group known as the…

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Many of us might dream about following our bliss, escaping the grind of the day-to-day life for travel and adventure, but Matt and Jessica Johnson actually took this plunge and have never looked back. In 2011, they sold their house, quit their jobs, and on August 12, departed for an indefinitely-long journey. They’ve visited 16 countries so far, including the Bahamas, Jamaica, Cuba, and Peru. And since 2012, they’ve had a third crew member in tow - their cat Georgie.

The couple adopted the feline from a no-kill animal shelter, and Georgie often accompanies them above deck. “She does very well with the sailing and is more steady on her feet than we are,” Jessica told news.com.au. Georgie loves sitting on…

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Japanese illustrator Maori Sakai takes everyday moments and turns them into positively sweet illustrations. She first caught our eye back in May with her animated GIFs that show happy moments in everyday life. When asked about the message she was trying to convey, she told us, “there's beauty in nature and in daily experiences. I think most people depend on others or a lot of money to feel this happiness, but I think, happiness is always a state of mind,” and that’s when we were hooked. Maori's positive message and happy illustrations had captured us. 

We’re thrilled to announce that we now have six of her illustrations available in the shop. You won’t…

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Before undergoing chemotherapy, Redditor Sarah K's 61-year-old mother decided that she wanted to try something new and exciting with her hair. The (not-so-)obvious solution? A hot pink mohawk!

The adventurous woman started by coloring her grey hair a vivid shade of pink and then fashioning it up like an 80's punk rocker. While this look certainly is memorable, it's not the first time this bold mom has experimented with her hair. Back in 2000, she was facing her first battle with breast cancer. At the time, she chose to have her hair reworked into tiny individual braids that covered the entirety of her head. After several weeks, she had them cut off and gave them to her close friends. "She looked like Tom Hanks with it clipped really short," Sarah shared on Reddit. "We called her Mom…

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Wedding photographer Chase Richardson was in the process of capturing Kristina and Will Moore's wedding party at Mississippi's McClain Lodge when something unexpected happened—he accidentally slipped and tumbled to the ground!

“It had been raining all morning so I ended up photographing the wedding party under this covered slab of concrete basically,” Richardson told PetaPixel. “There were puddles everywhere, and when I took a step back to get ready for the photo I just… slipped and fell. Pretty embarrassing.”

In the midst of his fall, the photographer's finger pressed…

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Using over 2,000 meters of blue cord, Brooklyn-based artist Aaron Asis breathed new life into West Philadelphia's St. Andrew's Collegiate Chapel. The space, which had been closed for more than 20 years, was the site of his temporary installation called Ci-Lines (pronounced “see-lines”). Asis created the impressive environment by wrapping and tying the colored paracord around the ornamental posts and columns that laid inside of the forgotten church.

Ropes intersected one another in all different directions, extending from the floor to the ceiling. “The geometry of Ci-Lines is like an artistic exercise in connecting the dots,” the artist told…

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Trading ink for coffee, Giulia Bernardelli creates stunning works of art using food as her medium. The Italian artist produces intricate paintings that look as though they’ve been created by spills or drippings from a spoon. Portraits, animals, and sprawling seas appear so effortlessly crafted that they look like they were just happenstance. But, it’s the ease of these whimsical compositions that truly showcases Bernardelli’s incredible skill.

Bernardelli has the gift of imagining a material’s potential, transforming it into something remarkable. She doesn’t plan her work in advance and instead trusts her instincts. “For example,” she tells Huffington Post France, “when…

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Artist Jonathan Fuller recycles the ocean-polished sea glass that he finds along Cornwall's coastline to create vibrant, yet calming, works of art. "These frosted shards are tumbled by the elements against rocks and sand, creating smooth-shaped textured jewels," Fuller told us. "It comes from a variety of sources including industry, sea defences, cargo spills as well as general littering. The most commonly found colours are greens, browns and clears from the bottling industry."

Now that a lot of glass packaging is being replaced by plastic, sea glass is harder to come by. But when he is able to find these discarded shards, Fuller takes the well-worn pieces and embeds them into wood panels to create intricate shapes and designs. Many of his sculptures look like blossoming flowers when…

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Just because a clay pot is broken doesn’t mean that you have to throw it out. Creative gardeners have developed a resourceful trend that repurposes the broken pieces into whimsical creations, making for a fantastic DIY project. Commonly known as fairy gardens, these arrangements fashion the clay into tiers or steps for succulents and moss to grow on. They often include small figurines or houses to make the pot look like tiny, fantastical creatures live there.

This project idea invites you to use your imagination and create something totally unique. The basic process involves collecting a clay pot and its broken shards, filling the larger portion of the pot with soil, and then positioning the fragments accordingly. Many people use them to build different levels within the overall basin. Once you those are secured, the fun begins! For your own project, start adding…

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A father-son duo, known as Tiger Tomato, are taking pancake art to another level. By combining their love of both food and art, the talented team create beloved cartoon characters like Garfield, Homer Simpson, and Frozen's Olaf out of colorful pancake batter. Their video portfolio of adorably delicious work includes a vivid rainbow and an elaborate, multi-colored ice cream cone.

Using food coloring, basic pancake mix, and water, the Australian father and son begin by creating their mixture and inserting it into a squeeze bottle. This bottle then allows the artistic dad to precisely outline the animated character on a griddle. Once this is done, the subject is filled in with additional mix, flipped over, and cooked just like a regular pancake.

Thus far, they…

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By venturing into the 30-million-year-old limestone caves on New Zealand's North Island, photographer Joseph Michael was able to capture magical images of the glowworms that call this place home. Against the natural backdrop that the cave provides, it looks as though there are hundreds of miniature, blue-tinted stars, but this is actually the work of glowworms known as Arachnocampa luminosa. Using a long-exposure method, the photographer was able to capture the glowworm larvae and their enchanting light in a way that makes the limestone formation look as though it's an indoor, starry sky.

In the close-up photos, you may notice that something is hanging from the bioluminescent gnat larvae. These are the twinkling larvae's nests, which are…

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Indonesia-based creative Romo Jack has a unique way of capturing the myriad of things he does with his hands. For a project called #whatmyhandsdoing, he photographs himself engaging in various activities—drawing, ironing, and even tattooing—that are all shot from an aerial point of view. The images are full of vibrant colors and beautiful arrangements, making the fantastic compositions a fun and intriguing look into his life.

The idea for Jack’s project came from his active lifestyle. “Just like how my eyes are always seeing from the time I wake up from bed to the time I fall back asleep, my hands are also doing something every second,” he tells the…

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In his ongoing project called Shopped Tattoos, artist Cheyenne Randall reimagines celebrities and other public figures as if they’re covered from head-to-toe in ink. We first shared his handiwork last year, and since that time, he’s been busy adding more tattoos onto pop culture icons. Movie stars, musicians, and even public figures all sport his digital adornments, and Randall has a knack for making the photo manipulations look incredibly realistic.

The artist has thoughtfully added tattoos that are specific to his subject—Muhammad Ali, a famous boxer, has the competitive phrase “bragging rights” on his hand, and musician Johnny Cash’s knuckles spell out “June” (which refers to his beloved wife, June…

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London-based installation artist Lee Borthwick has an extraordinary gift: she is able to seamlessly combine manmade mirrors with wooden stumps found in nature to form beautifully surreal works of art. The expert designer, who has presented her work as stand-alone wall art indoors and as a hidden exhibition in the middle of an otherwise untouched forest, creates pieces that are consistently eye-catching, regardless of its location.

Each sculpture and installation utilizes natural, organic, and reclaimed materials to present visual unity between man and nature. For her pieces that are taken out of their natural environment, chunks of wood are bound together by wire and hung from an unvarnished branch. What you may not realize at first is that the mirrors have actually been cut to resemble the distinct bumps…

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