All Posts (18408)

A culinary trend known as "dam curry" is delighting diners all across Japan. Dam curry is a special dish featuring rice shaped like a dam that is holding back a flood of delicious curry. This dish was first seen in 1965, but it has gained a tremendous amount of popularity near famous Japanese dams over the past eight years.

via [Boredpanda,…

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A group of enterprising teenagers in Seattle has turned out an innovative set of plans to make life easier for the city’s homeless population, and they’re now making the designs a reality. The Niceville encampment is a community officially sanctioned by the city of Seattle that offers shelter and structure to individuals seeking to turn their luck around. At this encampment, about 100 people find stability as they seek to get on their feet, and the student designers stepped in with plans for miniature houses providing security and a sense of home. “Residents in formal encampments transition to permanent housing at a much higher rate than typical shelters or informal camps due to a variety of factors,” project organizers explain on their website. “One surprising barrier people experiencing homelessness face is storage. You need a secure spot to keep your things in, in…

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Walking down the paint aisle at a home-improvement store and examining the vibrant hues of color swatches calls to mind an infinity of vague possibilities. But it’s often hard to visualize exactly how you could incorporate a new color into your everyday living space. Artist Shawn Huckins takes on the challenge by incorporating scenes into paint-swatch gradients. Employing a retro style that depicts average-Joe citizens in down-home environments, Huckins creates a sort of commentary on daily life while paint swatches serve as the backdrop.

Huckins says he was originally interested in doing The Paint Chip Series because he is fascinated by the mundane experiences and simple pleasures of daily life. That’s also why he chose to focus his work on the hardware-store-themed paint swatch cards. “Bands of color we may choose for our most intimate spaces—bedrooms,…

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Overlooking Italy’s Dolomite Mountains sits the Valley House, a timber cabin designed by architecture firm Plan Bureau. It’s a unique asymmetrical home whose shape was inspired by the topography of its gorgeous surroundings. Much of this structure seems beautifully unconventional, including the detailing on the facade and the placement of its windows.

One of the most striking things about the 1,259-square-foot house is its top-heavy design. Two diamond shapes are stacked on a triangular base, and the slanted walls have large, angled glazing that points towards the ground.

The entrance to the home is elevated and accessible via a short flight of stairs with an outdoor terrace surrounding it. Inside, the space is divided into two main levels. The communal areas are on the ground floor, split between a kitchen and dining/living area. Two bedrooms and a…

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When illustrator Marie Ulmer and photographer Candace Karch met in 2007, they became fast friends and embarked on an extraordinary photographic journey together. The two met at Bambi Gallery in Philadelphia when Candace represented the 97-year-old's work. Instantly, she was drawn to the older woman's lack of self-consciousness and knew that she wanted to use her as a muse. Since then, the two creatives have been friends for eight years. During this time, the camerawoman has captured private everyday snapshots of Marie, who never married or had children because she wanted to devote her life to her art.

The women trust each other entirely, which is shown when Marie's playful side is captured on film. Many of the images were taken in Ms. Ulmer's house, a familiar place where she has lived for her entire…

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The Canal & River Trust is an ecological charity that is encouraging people to be mindful of the animals that share our environment. This organization is responsible for maintaining over 2,000 miles of busy waterways in both England and Wales. Alongside these canals, there are designated paths where you will find cyclists, walkers, boaters, fishermen, and even horses pulling boats across the water. To remind citizens that they must safely and considerately spend time beside these bodies of water, the trust has made their motto “share the space; drop your pace; it’s a special place."

To hit this point home, Canal & River Trust recently created a special lane that is specifically for birds, ensuring that…

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Recently, colorful works of art have been appearing within potholes along Chicago's deteriorated roadways. To make these scarred areas beautiful, artist Jim Bachor has started filling cracked asphalt with mosaics of ice cream for a project known as Treats in the Streets. Each piece perfectly blends in with the road, adding a delightful effect to a neglected and seemingly dull area. The best part is that these pieces will most likely last for a long time, since they are made of sturdy glass and durable marble. 

This playful project is also occurring in Finland, where Bachor has surprised pedestrians with mosaics of flowers. "Using the same materials, tools and methods of the archaic craftsmen, I create mosaics that speak of modern things in an ancient voice. My work…

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The amazing light festival in Australia, Vivid Sydney, just started today and one of their standout installations is this new projection of trees and flowers blooming on the iconic Customs House. The 8-minute show mixes both familiar and unfamiliar sights of Sydney's natural environment to create a continually evolving blossoming world. The artwork was created to fit specifically to the architectural form of the building. The graphics are color-bursting images of blue and green butterflies, purple leaves and tiny red and white spotted mushrooms on sinuous trees. Spinifex Group, a company that specializes in immersive media experiences, is behind this work.

Here's what they told us about the meaning behind the show. "Beginning in Jurassic times, we have a moment when the dry earth gets cracked, revealing a waterfall scene filled with cockatoos. They fly us upwards…

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Memorial Day Weekend Sale on My Modern Shop

In honor of Memorial Day, we're now offering 20% off all art prints and canvases in our online store My Modern Shop! If minimalist movie posters are your thing, check out works by Nicholas Barclay, or if you're a Hitchcock fan, check out this fun new print called Them Birds by illustrator Dan Fajardo. Everyone's beloved droid R2-D2 gets dressed up as Captain America in the poster you see above by digital artist Steve Berrington. Have a fantastic long weekend, everyone!

My Modern Shop…

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“I was about to begin a journey, the journey of my life, in understanding how extraordinary women are, and how even when we view them as victims they are in fact heroes and survivors.” – Annie Griffiths, Executive Director of Ripple Effect and Photographer. Today, be blown away by the powerful photos and stories from the Ripple Effect. A team of journalists have dedicated themselves to document the plight of poor women around the world and the programs that are helping them as they deal with the devastating effects of climate change.

As one of the first women photographers to ever work for National Geographic, Annie Griffiths has personally covered women's issues on six continents. For more than two decades, she's dedicated a portion of her time each year to document the important work of aid organizations.

The Ripple Effect team travels to…

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The 2015 Cannes Film Festival has once again brought some of the world’s biggest stars and best films together. Photographer Vincent Desailly walked the red carpet and captured moments that were both glittery and candid, culminating in a series of gorgeous black-and-white pictures. The monochromatic compositions have a feeling of timelessness and vintage glamour.

Desailly’s dramatic photos aren’t always positioned right next to celebrities parading for the cameras. Very often, he stands back in the crowd with other photographers in front of him. Desailly ends up obscuring part of the frame with dark, out-of-focus heads, arms, and other cameras. This works to his advantage, however, and it’s a unique viewpoint that adds some behind-the-scenes action to the careful poise. It’s like we’re experiencing the excitement right alongside the photographer.…

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While creating a realistic-style portrait is impressive in its own right, Sean Yoro takes this practice a step further. He paints hyperrealistic murals of women all while floating on water! The New York City-based artist, who goes by Hula, produces these gorgeous works from his paddle board. He’s seen bobbing along the current, one hand steadying himself as he adds fine details and decorative tattoos to the ladies’ skin.

Hula paints his subjects at the water's edge on unassuming concrete walls. Part of their heads and shoulders are shown, but the rest of them seemingly exists below sea level. It’s as if these larger-than-life women are taking a leisurely dip. Their placement also has a mirroring effect and allows their portraits to extend beyond the wall. On the water, they appear in an opposing style - fractured and abstract.

Hula grew up on the island of Oahu in…

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Like artists Paul DeSomma and Marsha Blaker, Denise Romecki finds inspiration for her sculptures in cresting waves. The big difference is that, while DeSomma and Blaker work with glass, Romecki creates her original pieces using stoneware clay. Requiring at least two kiln firings, her ceramic sculptures resemble beautifully rising white-capped waves that have been stunningly frozen in time.

The central Ohio-based artist is a graduate of the Columbus College of Art and Design, with a master’s degree in fine arts from Ohio State University. Currently she teaches ceramics and sculpture at the Columbus Cultural Arts Center. Her works are all centered around the mystery and beauty of nature.

Here is her artist statement from…

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Six years after being commissioned, artist Andries Botha has finally unveiled his huge elephant sculptures made out of wire frames filled with stones. Emerging out of a freeway island in Durban, South Africa, the artwork is made of galvanized steel armature with stainless steel mesh and filled with rocks from a local quarry. The sculptures were meant to be completed ahead of the 2010 FIFA World Cup, but in February 2010, just two weeks from completion, the artist was told to stop by the African National Congress (ANC) because they believed the elephants were too similar to the Inkatha Freedom Party's logo.

While the city decided on whether the artist could complete the sculptures, vandals destroyed the artwork by splashing red paint all over…

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28-year-old Sonya Baumstein plans on being the first woman to complete an extraordinary journey. With no sail and no motor, Sonya will be rowing 6,000 nautical miles by herself from Choshi, Japan to San Francisco, California because she likes a good challenge. Using a 770-pound, 24 foot boat, this adventurous young woman will not only be taking on an incredible quest, she is also going to be working as a citizen scientist for NASA's Earth and Space Research program Aquarius. With special technology attached to her boat, the explorer will be collecting data on water temperatures, salinity levels, and currents as she rows along her path. 

Although this woman likes almost any extreme adventure, rowing holds a special place in her heart. When in college at the University of Wisconsin, Sonya was hit by a car and her fitness regime…

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Last month, we featured some gorgeous entries in the 2015 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest, and we’re now pleased to share more great submissions with you. The competition is one of our very favorites, and it showcases some truly stunning travel photography. These images represent many unique places around the world, and it allows you to discover parts of the planet you might've never known existed.

It’s not too late to enter the contest - the deadline is Tuesday, June 30 at 12 p.m. EDT. There are four categories, including: Travel Portraits; Outdoor Scenes;…

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For a year and a half, a cat named Russell has been giving people hope at North Carolina's Animal Emergency Hospital and Urgent Care clinic. In January 2014, Russell survived a catastrophic house fire, which destroyed his family's home and took the life of their pet dog. Not only did the cat suffer from second and third degree burns, he was also severely dehydrated and developed fatty liver syndrome from not eating for four days. Even though it seemed as if Russell would not survive, he quickly proved otherwise.

While he has been recovering, the friendly feline spends time snuggling up to fellow animals that are undergoing their own treatments at the clinic. A baby deer named Darla arrived this week after being found without her mother on someone's lawn and Russell immediately fell in love with his new friend. The adorable pet has also kept several dogs…

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When Juliet Smith unexpectedly could not attend her graduation ceremony at Guilford College, her school made sure to do something wonderful for this college senior. On May 15th, Juliet was planning to receive her diploma the very next day when her water broke while she was at a restaurant with her fiancé. Later that night, at exactly 11:57pm, her son Milo David Unger was born three weeks earlier than expected, preventing the dedicated student from walking across the stage at graduation. 

After the real celebration ended on Saturday, several faculty members heard about what had happened and decided to perform a shortened graduation for the new mother. In one of the hospital's classrooms, Professor of Geology Dave Dobson played “Pomp and Circumstance” on his tuba as Associate Professor of English Heather Hayton pushed Juliet’s wheelchair into the room. Milo…

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Hoang Tien Quyet has been folding paper ever since he was a kid. Amazed at how a flat sheet of paper could transform into a three dimensional object, he kept up the practice as he got older and eventually joined a Vietnam Origami Group forum. It was there that he met many friends who shared the same passion, and they inspired him to try a lesser-known technique called wet folding. Quyet now uses it to create charming animal figures like roosters, lions, foxes, and more.

Wet folding was pioneered by the late origami master Akira Yoshizawa. As the name suggests, water is involved, and it’s used to soften the paper during the folding process. The results are flowing, curved creases with rounded forms. But despite the malleable appearance, the creations are often rigid and shell-like.

The unconventional technique is a perfect fit for Quyet, as it produces elegant, fluid…

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Located near the base of Lion’s Head mountain in Cape Town sits the OVD 919 house. It’s a massive 10,000 square foot estate designed by the renowned architecture firm SAOTA. Despite its large size, the focus of the copper-roofed home is not only the structure itself, but the gorgeous sky and sea that surround it. SAOTA built it to honor the idyllic South African landscape.

The open and airy house is composed of concrete, glass and steel, and it faces the steep incline of the mountain. There are two storeys, and the top of the building features private living spaces for the home’s dwellers. Bedrooms and a few family rooms are stretched across this level. The window-filled first floor includes kitchen, dining, and living rooms, plus an outdoor terrace with a large pool.

At times, it’s hard to tell where the outdoors ends and the indoors begins, but this…

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