art (6739)

Many fashion designers have a muse, so it’s no surprise that illustrator JaeSuk Kim employs the same idea in his stylish paintings. Known as the Susu girls, these whimsical figures don beautiful gowns imagined by Kim. The ethereal garments are created primarily using water-based media, and they’re vibrant explosions of color—Kim often lets his pigment flow freely over the page, embracing the diffused edges as if they’re bunches of lightweight fabric or feathers.

Painting for the Susu girls is all about taking chances. “I add shapes, lines and textures spontaneously to create an abstract and fluid form to represent couture-like dresses,” Kim explained to Instagram Blog. Describing one of his favorite approaches, he…

Read more…

Mosques are traditionally known for their splendidly elaborate architecture, with elegant halls, courtyards, and niches providing precious space for congregation and prayer. Illustrator Mariam Abbas honors the magnificence of the sacred structures in her miniature drawings, which convey the intricate domes and minarets at the tiny size of a paper clip.

Abbas’ renditions of Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque,…

Read more…

This original Boeing 747 dates back to 1985, but it’s been given new life in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert, where it landed for Burning Man just several days ago. The annual experiential art festival often plays host to innovative mobile exhibitions, but this converted aircraft represents the largest art car in its history, inviting attendees on board for a series of immersive, interactive engagements.

To enter the jet, everyone is invited to pass through the “insecurity checkpoint” and drop off their “emotional baggage” before revealing where they’re headed in their symbolic “journey through life.” Inside, a continuous string of parties, musical performances, and other events are tied to the theme of purposeful dreaming. The “First Class lounge” will hold daily talks with international thought leaders, while the upper deck will offer a vast view across the…

Read more…

With the right tools and techniques, ceramics can look like more than just clay. Artist Brett Kern demonstrates its seemingly shape-shifting properties with his clay dinosaurs that faithfully resemble soft, inflatable toys. To create this illusion, Kern forms creases and folds in all the places you’d expect for an air-filled object—its seams. The tiny wrinkles on the dinosaurs’ bodies, arms, and legs resemble plastic material being stretched and pulled. Coupled with shiny glazing, it’s as if these creatures could pop the prick of a pin.

Kern uses mold-making to craft his work, something that he compares to the fossilization process—an apt comparison, considering the subject matter. “Objects are covered in a material that captures their shape and texture,” he explains in his …

Read more…

Nail polish is no longer limited to fingers and toes. Chan Clayrene of Artclaytion uses nail polishes, matte and sparkly alike, as the ink for her glamorous illustrations of haute couture gowns. Her designs are inspired by luxury labels, such as Dolce & Gabbana, Valentino, and Ralph & Russo, as well as by her own creative imagination. Clayrene's nouveau watercolor art is dreamlike in texture—with edges evaporating into the blankness of the paper—while her colors are bold, thanks to the vivacious hues of her nail polish palette. This blooming effect is not surprising, given that many of her fashionable illustrations include drawn, or sometimes even real, flowers that burst from the page with three-dimensional power.

Clayrene…

Read more…

Jessica Blazek translates renowned works from art history into embroideries that fit in the palm of your hand. Her online shop called Thimble Thistle features the exquisite landscapes of world-famous artists like Vincent van Gogh, Hokusai, and Claude Monet as they’re meticulously recreated with colorful threads. Each of Blazek’s pieces convey the original paintings’ essence as her tiny stitches represent the bold brush strokes for which each respective artist is so well known.

Blazek displays her completed embroideries in tiny hoops to wear around your neck. The pendants are attached to antique bronze-plated chains, but if necklaces aren’t your style, she’s able to convert any of these pieces into brooches by simply adding a pin back.

The stitched accessories are now for sale in the…

Read more…

Floral crowns have long ruled as a whimsical way to adorn your head, but sea shell-encrusted headdresses have recently made a splash as a gorgeous alternative. Artist Iryna Osinchuck-Chajka of Eten Iren adds to this unique crown trend, although she takes a step back from the water and focuses on dry land. Her fairy tale hair accessories feature kaleidoscopes of butterflies that look like they’ve gathered around your head. It’s as if you have magical powers that summon these beautiful creatures and compel them to follow you wherever you go.

This delicate illusion is crafted with EVA foam, which is a flexible and formable material that can be transformed in a myriad of ways. Osinchuck-Chajka hand cuts the…

Read more…

Architect Frank Gehry is famous throughout the world for his modern, dynamic buildings that boast awe-inspiring designs. What he’s less well-known for, however, is his work in the fine art world. Between 1984 and 1986, he produced Fish Lamps, a series of illuminated sculptures featuring graceful koi whose bodies twist and turn as if they’re swimming through water.

Gehry’s exploration into this realm of creatures influenced his later architectural work. The fish became a motif in his buildings, appearing as undulating, curvilinear forms present on designs like the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain.

In 2012, Gehry revisited his Fish Lamps series and created an entirely new school of them. Like his designs from the…

Read more…

When you visit an art museum, the people watching is an added bonus to the incredible creativity that lines the walls. From afar, Karin Jurick observes patrons as they intently look at iconic artworks, capturing these moments with her camera. She later paints both the people and the pieces that captivated their attention for her voyeuristic series called Museum Patrons.

Jurick’s concept has her recreate some of the world’s most renowned paintings like Gustav Klimt’s The Kiss and Vincent van Gogh’s Starry Night. These prized works are treated with the same attention to detail as the passerbys, whose attitudes are the most compelling part of Museum Patrons. Their body language demonstrates how they prefer to observe the art, and everyone has a slightly different style. Some lean into the…

Read more…

For Annie Vought, writing represents an emotional revelation of the inner self. She renders that delicate relationship between words and personal identity in her intricate, hand-cut art. Using an X-acto knife, Vought slices tiny typography into large paper sheets, creating carefully coiled lexicons and newly labyrinthian replicas of found notes.

In an interview with the Art Museum of Sonoma County, Vought explains the significance that attracts her to inscribed language: “In the penmanship, word choice, and spelling the author is revealed in spite of him/herself. A letter is physical confirmation of who we were at the moment it was written, or all we have left of a person or a period of time. I also think…

Read more…

For Annie Vought, writing represents an emotional revelation of the inner self. She renders that delicate relationship between words and personal identity in her intricate, hand-cut art. Using an X-acto knife, Vought slices tiny typography into large paper sheets, creating carefully coiled lexicons and newly labyrinthian replicas of found notes.

In an interview with the Art Museum of Sonoma County, Vought explains the significance that attracts her to inscribed language: “In the penmanship, word choice, and spelling the author is revealed in spite of him/herself. A letter is physical confirmation of who we were at the moment it was written, or all we have left of a person or a period of time. I also think…

Read more…

For a few fleeting days earlier this August, an exquisite ephemeral carpet of fresh flowers graced the cobblestone at Grand Place, the central square in Brussels, Belgium. Spanning 75 meters long and 24 meters wide, it consisted of 1,800 square meters of begonias carefully interspersed with dahlias, grasses, and bark, with each square meter containing about 300 blooms. Together, the bright blossoms rendered an elegant tapestry of Japanese-inspired motifs, appearing from a distance like a magnificently vibrant woven rug.

The creation was the 20th iteration in a bi-annual tradition, launched back in 1971 and displayed at the Grand Place since 1986. Every other year on August 15th, Belgian nonprofit Tapis de Fleur has assembled a group of professional artists (including illustrators, graphic designers, and landscape architects) to develop a large-scale floral design around a…

Read more…

If a halved avocado could talk, what would it say? According to illustrator Charly Clements, it’d admit, “I feel so empty inside.” Through her clever series Real Life Lines, Clements has imagined what the buttery fruit and other inanimate objects would utter if given the chance. She brings them to life with simple lines and handwritten text on photographs that convey these candid thoughts. Amusing in tone, the cartoonish characters express many of the emotions that we humans have, like feelings of joy or distress. And much to our delight, Clements works in pun-laced phrases whenever possible.

Real Life Lines is an Instagram-based project. Aside from being lighthearted and charming, it has another purpose. Every image—and the subjects of Clement’s illustrations—are linked back to the people who…

Read more…

Russian photographer Ivan Hafizov is on a mission of historic preservation. For many centuries, Russia has prided itself on its intricate woodworking called nalichniki. The craft was used particularly to decorate window casings—the trim molding that originates at the windowsill and wraps up and around the glass—creating a dainty border. Although the exact reason for this tradition isn't clear, window decorating may have started in pagan times and were designed to protect a home's inhabitants from evil spirits. Due to wars, house abandonment or damage, and fragility of wood, these beautifully ornate designs are becoming quickly endangered. That's why Hafizov aims to salvage the memory of these beautifully designed works of architectural art with his camera. 

For the past few…

Read more…

Look closely at Tom Eckert’s artwork because things are not what they seem. His effortlessly-draped fabrics and their gentle folds are not meticulously-styled photographs, but sculptures that have been crafted from wood. Using traditional techniques to carve, construct, and paint his life-sized pieces, they appear light and airy, like a gentle breeze could dismantle their arrangement. But, Eckert assures us the opposite and chooses woods that are known for their stability—helping to further his impressive illusions.

Eckert’s interest in fooling the eye dates back to his youth. “Since childhood,” he explains, “I have been curious about and amused by mistaken impressions of reality presented as part of…

Read more…

Earlier this year, Ola Shekhtman inspired our sense of wanderlust with her gorgeous rings featuring beloved cityscapes from around the world. The intricate gold, platinum, and sterling silver accessories—produced with 3D printing technology—took us to places like New York City, London, Hong Kong, and Berlin, as each exquisite ring depicted defining characteristics of the chosen place.

Shekhtman has continued to create her quirky statement rings and added more iconic skylines. The famous Hollywood sign is featured in her Los Angeles band, the Colosseum is prominently displayed for Rome, and La Sagrada Família is an unmistakable fixture for Barcelona. Each piece includes several areas of interest within the circular composition and allows you to wear the city in slightly…

Read more…

Great design is two fold: it simultaneously solves a problem while enhancing our lives in an aesthetically-pleasing way. Khalili Engineers is putting this idea into practice with their plans for The Pipe, a stunningly modern-looking structure that would provide clean drinking water to the city of Santa Monica in California. Proposed to sit off the coast of its world-famous pier, the concept is a finalist in the 2016 Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) design competition.

The LAGI challenged its entrants to combine an energy and/or drinking water component into a sustainable construction that will enhance the picturesque landscape. “The time is now,”…

Read more…

In Japan, a creative new food trend is transforming an everyday dish into an aesthetically alluring delicacy: mosaic sushi. Instagram foodies are arranging their colorful blocks of rice, fish, and vegetables like juxtaposed tiles, compiling geometric patterns that highlight the diverse variety within each meal.

Orange stripes of salmon pair perfectly against pale pink tuna; thin strips of cucumber balance out a plate with cubes of cool green; and tiny garnishes like roe and edible flower petals create the perfect embellishments, rendering the bite-size squares with the gorgeous detailing of fine ceramics.

You can peruse more of the soothing symmetry and vibrant color palates on Instagram.

Above image via…

Read more…

Art is for everyone, and everyone includes your dog! More Than teamed up with British artist and inventor Dominic Wilcox to create the first art exhibition for canines, which opened for just two days last weekend. As part of the #PlayMore campaign, the interactive installation's mission was to encourage humans to spend more time playing with their animal buddies. In fact, each work of art was consulted by veterinarians to ensure the physical and mental stimulation would be enjoyable for the doggy patrons. Given all the photos of dogs leaping for joy, smelling shoes, and chasing virtual frisbees, the weekend was a success.

Wilcox, the genius behind…

Read more…

Fashion designer Adam Saaks demonstrates the incredible power that a pair of scissors can wield. For over 14 years, he has refined a design technique that involves nothing more than shiny, razor-sharp blades and strategically-placed snips. With his tool and an eye for style, he cuts intricate motifs into ordinary bodysuits, dresses, and jumpsuits, transforming them into high-fashion ensembles with ladder-like patterns that accentuate the curves of the human body.

Although Saaks’ creations are impressive on their own, they become even more so once you learn his process. He often hosts live cutting events where he’ll trim and shape a garment as it’s being worn. The performance aspect presents its own challenge, as he has to come up with a design on the spot. With a crowd watching, every cut matters—unlike conventional…

Read more…

SIGN UP FOR OUR WEEKLY NEWSLETTER