art (6542)

Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto wields ordinary table salt as the primary component in his awe-inspiring sculptural pieces. He has recently completed two new monumental salt installations that suffuse the halls of a castle tower of Algues-Mortes, a medieval walled city preserved from the 13th century, located in Southern France. Respectively entitled Floating Garden and Labyrinth, the two splendid artworks draw upon ritualistic symbolism of the element and celebrate the importance of the salt industry to the region.

Both pieces are meticulous constructions—Floating Garden (above) took 45 hours, over the course of five days, to be completed. The circular lacework pattern was created as Yamamoto quietly sat in the ancient space, shaking a container of salt in a gentle rhythm and…

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16-year-old Lara Wirth produces body painting with effects so believable that they startle strangers with their realism. “After finishing a creation [on myself], looking in the mirror can be a little frightening,” she told the Instagram blog. “I did once make a man scream in the supermarket when I rounded a corner right in front of him. He wasn’t prepared to be met by a zombie.”

Inspired by the special effects she had seen on television, the Melbourne-based teen started body painting when she was just 14 years old. In the two years since she’s been covering herself in colorful pigments, glitter, and sculptural materials, the more complex her makeup appears. Wirth transforms herself into fantastical…

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Illustrator Katie Daisy was raised among the wildflowers and grew up with a deep appreciation for the natural world. This love for warm breezes, feathered friends, and green meadows has stayed with her into adulthood, and she infuses the same liveliness and vibrant colors into everything she creates.

Daisy pairs the great outdoors with short quotes and mantras to inspire our everyday lives—even if you’re stuck inside for most of the day. She surrounds hand-lettered phrases by late-greats Oscar Wilde, Monet, and Eleanor Roosevelt with gorgeous painted floral wreaths. Together, they communicate sentiments of hope and love while offering a powerful reminder to be our true selves.

Daisy sells her charming works in The Wheatfield, her popular Etsy…

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The morning commute in France just got a lot more beautiful. The SNCF (French National Railway Company) recently customized their public train system with a collection of glorious impressionist artworks. The art and culture promo was completed in collaboration with 3M and is set up exclusively this summer for trains running from Gare Saint-Lazare to Vernon-Giverny. The chosen trains are covered with reproductions of Impressionist paintings gathered from the Musée d'Orsay, photographs of architecture from Versaille, and images taken from Cinema Gaumont, allowing passengers a tranquil voyage through the country.

The project further examines ties between art and railroads—the J line linking the two stops travels through areas that served as landscape inspiration for some of the featured artists, before…

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Tattoo artist Gakkin produces delicate works on skin that are designed with a freehand approach. Opting to draw directly onto his client's body before tattooing an image, the Japanese artist forgoes a stencil and tailors each design to the specific person—other artists, in contrast, would create something beforehand, show it to their client, and then use transfer paper to place it on the skin.

Gakkin describes his tattoos as “a new approach to traditional Japanese themes.” He uses classic imagery and decorates his clients with flowers, leaves, and waves, while also incorporating contemporary styles. Gakkin covers the body in ink to create bold blackout tattoos or uses a hint of red for a striking accent. Never straying too far from his roots, however, he follows the wabori rules of Japanese tattooing, which dictates standards like…

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When it rains, it pours poetry on the streets of Boston. Nonprofit Mass Poetry is collaborating with Boston's Mayor's Office on an ongoing project called Raining Poetry, gradually spraying the sidewalks with secret sonnets and rhymes that reveal themselves only when the showers start.

Danielle Georges, the city's Poet Laureate, picked the first four poems for the series. She selected watery-themed works by Langston Hughes, Elizabeth McKim, Barbara Helfgott Hyett, and Gary Duehr, all of whom have played powerful roles in Boston's literary and cultural scenes. Each piece was made into a stencil by a local artist—including Lesley College of Art and Design students Morgan French and Marco Kienle, plus Artisans Asylum's Miles Donovan—and then installed starting in April by the Mayor’s Mural Crew, a…

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French sculptor Matthieu Robert-Ortis has utilized the transformative influence of perspective in his brilliantly executed piece, La révolution des Girafes. From one angle, it looks like a pair of elegant giraffes, but from an alternative point of view, it’s the spitting image of a giant elephant. Everything changes depending on the viewer's perspective.

In an interview with Taker Magazine, Robert-Ortis shared the running theme behind his work. He explained that the average person tends to only see what's right before his/her eyes, whether a tangible object or an abstract idea, but creative types are more likely to explore alternative angles. Robert-Ortis…

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With a series of mesmerizingly fluid gestures, ceramicist Eric Landon forms beautiful vessels on a pottery wheel. They’re crafted with a minimalist aesthetic and look deceptively simple in their execution, but they take an incredible amount of skill to produce.

Working under the name Tortus Copenhagen, Landon is eager to showcase and share what he knows. He creates high-speed videos that demonstrate the process of “throwing” from beginning to end. It starts with a lump of clay on a wheel, and then Landon makes tiny, calculated movements to push and pull the material into a variety of shapes. Afterwards, the newly-formed pot is fired in a kiln and has some glaze applied, but Landon refrains from adding any patterning or surface decoration—he lets the elegant form speak for itself.

Last year, Landon began…

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Artist Liz West has recently revealed an ambitious piece that explores the visual impact of light and reflections within an ancient place of worship. The piece casts a brilliant rainbow spectrum throughout the architecture of the historic St. John’s Church in North Lincolnshire, UK. Composed of over 700 mirrors in 15 acrylic shades, Our Color Reflection causes light rays and vivid hues to radiate throughout the 125-year-old building.

"It is playful, elegant, engaging, and probably my most thoughtful and quiet work," West says of her installation. A tasteful modern spin on the stained-glass motif, West’s orbs flood the building with a rich, meditative atmosphere. Set at different heights and sizes, the…

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London-based graphic designer Mick Watson of Smart Giant has created a colorful collection of prints that consist of various difficult words coupled with simple visual components. The ongoing project, known as The Graphic Dictionary of Interesting Words, reveals the meaning of complex and often obscure terms through simple but charming illustrations. By pairing the archaic words with as few strokes or shapes as possible, these clever minimalistic creations help make the task of expanding one’s lexicon a little more straightforward.

Watson actually began the project as a means of supplementing his daughter’s vocabulary. Originally conceived as a Word of the Day project for the young girl, he began pairing eye-catching colors and simple icons with short…

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Madrid-based artist Irma Gruenholz creates her evocative three-dimensional "illustrations" using clay and plasticine. She sculpts the materials into soft-edged human renderings and then hand-paints them in whimsical color schemes, designing entrancing dioramas that invite imaginative interpretations from viewers.

The scenes are at once relatable and dreamlike, seemingly paused in the delicate space between dreams and everyday life. Some are more fantastical than others, but each one has the tender warmth and whimsy of a tiny fairytale, as if expressing the intriguing, unspoken mysteries of our internal lives and emotions.…

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UK-based Chameleon Art Products is transforming the modern illustrator’s toolbox with these innovative pens, which allow artists to create over 100 color tones and a wide variety of shading effects with a set of just 20 markers. The company exploded on Kickstarter in September 2015 and quickly earned international acclaim (including a Red Dot Design Award in April 2016); now, they’re introducing their products to the Japanese market, inciting a new surge of international excitement.

The double-ended pens come with both bullet and brush tips, uniquely fabricated in Japan with special wicking properties. Using a gravity-based system, the permanent, quick-drying, rich-tinted inks are…

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Doughnuts are more than just a tasty treat—they’re a blank slate for amazing food art. Australian baker Vickie Liu peppers her Instagram account with adorable iterations of the beloved pastry, crafting smiling creatures with colorful icing and playful additions like ears and horns. Using ingredients such as matcha powder and chocolate for pigment, she sculpts cats, pandas, and faithfully recreates beloved cartoon characters. Sprinkles, like spectacular jewels, are often well-placed accents.

Liu calls herself a “professional eater,” meaning that she actually consumes her mouthwatering creations. We can’t say we blame her—their charming faces might make you pause for a second… and then enjoy.…

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Barcelona-based sculptor Jordi Díez Fernández fabricates stunning and expressive sculptures out of scraps of shiny metal. The skilled artist adeptly creates figurative pieces, transforming the unyielding material into recognizable and emotive forms. He manages to add a sense of warmth and humanity to cold, hard steel. This particular piece, titled Celia, is an intricate installation that simultaneously celebrates the human form and pays tribute to the artist's wife. 

On his website, Fernández refers to the nearly 6-foot-high piece as a “monumental portrait on steel through the total synthesis of a given physiognomy.” The expressive construct stares out at the world from where her bust stands. The artist's homage to his wife captures a realistic sense of expression, though he also…

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These multi-faceted toy animals were born out of freelance illustrator and 3D artist Mat Szulik’s desire to explore the boundaries of low poly design. Though they appear to be carved from wood, they are actually digital concepts created by the Polish artist in his spare time. Titled PolyWood v1.0, the collection of life-like creatures emerge from polygon illustrations that have been covered with a wood-textured appliqué.

PolyWood is a personal project that combines toy and product design with Szulik’s artistic background. Low poly refers to the number of polygons that appear in a graphic mesh within 3D creations, and is a method for displaying models of objects on computers with a reduced rendering time.…

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Physical contact with precious art tends to be prohibited, but Andrew Myers and Cantor Fine Art are bucking that norm with their new, uniquely meaningful collaboration. Please Touch the Art challenges people to see artwork from more diverse perspectives—even without actually seeing it.

The project's source of inspiration stems from a gallery show about five or six years ago, when Myers watched the way a blind visitor engaged with his 3D sculpted artworks, which are painted on thousands of screws that he drills into canvas at varying depths. After hearing verbal descriptions of the works, the blind stranger reached out to touch the…

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Many people love the idea of having a tattoo but are unsure of what they'd want on their body for the rest of their life. Tech startup Ephemeral is currently developing a way to wear an inked design for an extended period of time without the eternal commitment. Their solution uses a process akin to traditional tattooing, but will last only about a year before it begins to fade.

Conventional body art is made permanent because the dye molecules are too big for our immune systems to eliminate. Ephemeral incorporates this same idea, but they’ve developed smaller molecules and encapsulated them in a protective coating that will eventually break down after the 365-day mark. If you want the tattoo removed sooner, a special solution could be applied that will instantly remove it.

Ephemeral is still testing…

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Artist Dina Brodsky wowed us with her miniature landscape paintings last year, and she has since embarked on another nature-inspired series she calls The Secret Life of Trees. The basic idea behind the project is to illustrate 126 different trees from all corners of the world, celebrating these life-giving plants that so many of us overlook in our day-to-day lives. In an email, Brodsky explains to us that some are “drawn from observation, some from imagination, and some from photographs and stories shared by people who want to contribute to the project.”

From the barren, gnarled branches of a tree in Sweden to a vivacious tree in Spain with leaves the size of your palm, Brodsky…

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For most of us, the Etch A Sketch is just a toy, but for artist Jane Labowitch, it’s an unconventional canvas and tool for her intricate drawings. Twisting and turning the two plastic knobs, she’s recreated one of history’s most iconic pointillist paintings: Georges Seurat’s 1884 masterpiece, A Sunday on La Grande Jatte. It took Labowitch eight and a half hours to render its likeness—all while she was sitting in front of the original piece at the Art Institute of Chicago. The results are impressive, to say the least. Especially when held up next to Seurat’s painting, it's made abundantly clear that Labowitch has managed to capture the essence of the masterpiece's composition.

Labowitch has been honing her craft for nearly all her life. “I've been pretty consistently using an Etch A Sketch as an…

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Though spaghetti makes for a tasty ingredient in the kitchen, it seems like it’d have an unlikely place in the fashion world. Illustrator Edgar Artis thinks differently. Kiwis, chocolate, bell peppers—these are all unconventional choices for evening gowns, yet the artist manages to transform them and other real-life objects into fabulous fashion illustrations. Using a combination of colored pencil drawings as well as fruits, matches, seashells, and flowers, he fuses the 2D with the 3D for a whimsical effect.

The women that Artis depicts wear glamorous, high-fashion ensembles, and their style of dress often dictates the type of objects he’ll use. A flowing gown is adorned with long feathers or petals that mimic how fabric would hang. For shorter, voluminous…

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