art (6671)

Floral crowns may be a staple for festivals and whimsical parties, but Chelsea Shiels is taking the world by storm with her mermaid-inspired, seashell-encrusted headdresses. The glittering designs are loaded with small conch shells, crystals, and gold accents that will make anyone wearing them feel like Princess Ariel. Shiel beautifully integrates her different findings, mixing and matching colors and textures to create multifaceted, wearable works of art that have a modern, bohemian vibe.

Necessity is truly the mother of invention, and Shiel’s crowns were motivated by her need to cover a scar she’d had on her forehead since she was a baby. “I got teased a lot, so I started making my own headwear because I couldn’t find any I liked,” she explained to …

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Artist Mathieu Tremblin recently took to the streets of Rennes, France with a bit of an odd mission: to make the graffiti scribbles a little more legible. His educational background in graffiti culture and fine arts, along with his past work with site specific urban interventions and branding, provided Tremblin with the perfect springboard to this quirky and humorous project.

After documenting the "before" shots, Tremblin went to work, mimicking the size, coloring, and layering of each tag in his own crisp hand-sprayed font—so crisp, in fact, it almost looks like computer typography. While not exactly "cleaning" up the vandal's work, nor creating a more pleasing aesthetic, Tremblin draws attention to the pleasure of words. He reminds us that simple words like "Zoob," "Flexo," "Norse," and "Frisk" can…

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Derbyshire-based painter Darren Reid creates stunning, photorealistic landscapes of serene seascapes, expansive landscapes, and bustling cityscapes. Each work, when looked at closely enough, reveals a layer of acrylic detail that heightens the painting to a hyperrealistic level. A road is not just a road, but a pointillist blend of colors (think Seurat or Pissarro) that fuse together when looked at to play tricks on the viewer's eye. Reid has mastered a strange and awesome technique: how to take impressionist skills and turn them into reality. His paintings, often of stark country houses or gritty industrial pavements, reinvent what it means to look at the world. He shows us there is more than meets the eye at first glance. 

Despite his keen eye and skilled hand, Reid picked up his paintbrush later in…

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Fans of art history and puns have found a kindred spirit in ChattyFeet, a company known for their quirky and unusual footwear. They’ve recently launched a series of colorful artist socks that immortalize famous folks throughout painting such as Frida Khalo (known as Frida Callus), Vincent van Gogh (aka Vincent Van Toe), and Picasso (lovingly called Feetasso).

The delightful designs feature the artists’ faces stretched over the toes while legs are reserved for the motifs and colors associated with the particular person. Van Gogh’s socks have swirling patterns akin to his Starry Night painting while Picasso’s signature striped turtleneck trails beneath his stylized face.

For those looking to creatively warm their feet, ChattyFeet sells their garments through their…

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Artist Kristián Mensa sees the incredible potential in everyday objects. To him, a pear is not just a piece of fruit, but the body of a small bird. Likewise, a toilet paper roll doubles as a miniaturized red carpet for tiny celebrities. To create these whimsical compositions, Mensa pairs these items with minimalist drawings that incorporate the 3D elements among bold lines. The results are amusing, reflecting Mensa’s uplifting way of looking at the world.

“Since I was a little kid,” Mensa explained on Bored Panda, “I’ve been always trying to look at things from a different perspective.” Still a teenager, the perceptive young artist has realized that even the most ordinary of objects can…

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At first glance, London-based architect and designer Umut Yamac's Perch Light series looks like carefully folded pieces of origami art. However, they're fully functional lamps that invite viewers to touch them. The simplicity of the life-size "paper" bird sculptures are, in Yamac's own words, poetry. Turn the lights down low and watch the birds glow from the inside out. This is origami as you've never seen it before.

Each stylized bird is a combination of synthetic paper, brass, and steel. For the launch of the project in 2014, Yamac balanced his angular birds delicately on a perch, so they could rock back and forth naturally with the wind or from a finger's touch. It's the contact with the perch that illuminates the…

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Illustrator and designer Mal Jones found the perfect project to keep himself creative for over a year, while also promoting the “illustration chops” of Rocketkoi—a full-service design company he co-founded with his wife Sarah Meskin. The artist embarked on a playful series about animals and the unique words used to describe their collective groups. The project is creatively referred to as Nomencreatures—a portmanteau of the terms nomenclature and creatures. Coined by fellow illustrator Lisa Bee during a brainstorming session, Jones tells us, “It seemed pretty apropos for a collection of art about the names of groups of creatures.”

While we’re familiar with some group names—pride of lions, school of fish,…

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When Pippa Branham and her family moved into their first permanent house in Liverpool last year, she knew that this was finally her chance to personalize her living space any way she wanted. After scrolling through pages of Pinterest projects, she came across an image of stairs painted to look like books. There were no instructions or tutorials, but Branham had made up her mind—she was going to transform her own stairs into a stack of books.

According to the Reddit post written up by her husband, Jon, the project "initiated out of a money saving venture to avoid having to splash out £200+ [~$265+] on carpeting the stairs." Instead, Branham's project put her out just £20 (about $27) for the…

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Self-taught artist Andreea Berindei has honed her painting and drawing skills to an extraordinary level. A passionate artist, she first began to paint at a very early age and cites the source of her creativity to rest in her faith and unwavering dedication to her spirituality. Born in Romania, the young Berindei has received multiple awards for her remarkable pieces, and for years has used her talent to spread positivity through her involvement in the Peace Project, an organization that seeks to render social change by mobilizing the creative community.

Delicate and vibrant shading work imbues Berindei’s colorful drawings and paintings with a realistic quality that speaks volumes to her artistic abilities. As the nature and material of her work varies over time, Berindei continuously proves that she is…

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An enormous, commanding 1,320-ton sculpture of the Chinese god of war, Guan Yu, was unveiled on July 11th in China’s Hubei province in Jingzhou city. Guan Yu, was a Chinese military general who had tremendous martial prowess during his time, and was deified as a god of war after his death. He is also an epitome of loyalty and righteousness.

Guan Yu lived during a restless period in Chinese history known as the Three Kingdoms, and is often depicted holding his “reclining moon blade” named the Green Dragon Crescent Blade, which he wielded against his enemies and was said to weigh an impressive 40 lbs (18.25 kg).

A sight to behold, the entire sculpture stands at just over 190 feet (58 meters) tall, seeming to watch over the city and its residents. Over 4,000 strips of bronze were glued over the sculpture, and Guan Yu is portrayed as a fearless…

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Crimean artist Pis Saro takes inspiration from her travels and innate fascination with nature to create her soft and dreamlike tattoo designs. "The mood of my art changes with the seasons," Saro told Illusion Magazine. "I grow flowers and watch them attentively, looking at each fractal detail in petals and leaves. They’re not as simple as they seem! I like to study plants, animals and birds of different countries, too, always searching for new ideas." This year alone, the traveling tattooist has visited Turkey, Lebanon, Germany, Holland, the Czech Republic, and Switzerland—always opting for natural reserves over cluttered cities. "In nature," says Saro, "everything is perfect."

Saro's sense of…

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Artist Crystal Liu fills her dazzling compositions with beautiful flora and meticulously painted gold dots. The minuscule circles move through each piece like waves, creating a feeling of motion as they expand and contract in size. At times, their placement mimics tiny islands or clouds—especially when set against dark backdrops of blue and black watercolor paint. This motif is punctuated with Chrysanthemum flowers that are large enough to “rule” the abstracted scenes.

Liu’s paper works seemingly describe places, but to areas where we could never physically visit—intangible psychological and emotional landscapes. The imagery, rather than documenting real locales, are symbolic accounts of emotional states and personal relationships. Their visual power comes from within ourselves and the ease in which we can find special meaning in the…

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When you stand among the handiwork of teamLab, a Japanese tech art studio, you’re seemingly transported to a sprawling foreign land that engulfs you in a vibrant, light-filled splendor. This immersive approach is now the focus of a massive exhibition that spans 3,000 square meters (over 32,000 square feet) and is called DMM.Planets Art by teamLab. It showcases a variety of the group’s digital work throughout the years, including new pieces just revealed to the public.

The exhibition features four spaces that offer kaleidoscopic color schemes and multisensory activities. Each piece has its own distinct smell, including: the aroma of flowers, a forest, and “the universe”—a scent that astronaut Naoko Yamazaki helped create.

Though the teamLab works all have a different look and feel, interactivity is woven…

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There hasn’t been a more fitting Kodak moment for the George Eastman Museum than when they recently purchased two remarkably rare boxes of Kodak films. The first is the only known box of Kodak Film introduced for the Kodak camera in 1888, and the other is one of three boxes of Kodak Transparent Film introduced in 1889.

The price of a Kodak camera in 1888 was $25, and for a fee of $10 the film was developed, the prints were made, and a new roll of film was inserted before the camera was sent back to the owner. Due to the ease of use, the company adopted the slogan “You press the button, we do the rest.” 

Roll film established the Eastman Kodak Company as one of the most successful and profitable businesses for much of the twentieth century, with their Kodak snapshots…

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UK-based artist Faye Halliday creates art that's inspired by a combination of her travels, her attempts to inspire love, creativity, and adventure in others, and her desire to understand and capture beauty. She uses ink and intricate patterns to create elaborate portraits of animals and symbols. “I've always been inspired by beauty. Never on a superficial level, but more so as a concept; an interpretation and what it means to different people.”

Halliday calls the journey of her art Haathi, which came about during her experience at The Elephant Festival in Jaipur, Rajasthan. For this single day of the year, elephant owners celebrate and embellish the beautiful creatures with vibrant colored scarves, headdresses, saddle cloth, and heavy jewelry while people perched atop sprinkle colored powder. After the Festival, she was compelled to explore the concept and perceptions of beauty around…

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French street artist Patrick Commecy has been giving the buildings around France face-lifts as he revitalizes and transforms old, monochromatic facades into massive, vibrant, and realistic frescoes. From residences to offices and abandoned buildings, Commency has designed and produced more than 300 paintings in France and around the world.

Commecy and his team of artists use trompe-l'œil to bring city walls to life, an art technique that was popular during the Baroque period. Trompe-l'œil, translating to “deceive the eye,” focuses on depicting realistic imagery and creating optical illusions of three dimensional objects.

Commecy takes care to ensure that the frescoes depict the histories, cultures, and unique attributes of the towns and cities they are located in, and often…

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Figurative paintings of women draped in gauze explore concepts of emotional imprisonment and inner strength in Kwon Kyung-yup’s melancholic series, aptly titled Bandages. Perfectly formed in paint, her creations are physically unflawed yet their emotional turmoil clearly seeps through every pore. Minimal in both detail and color, Kwung-yup’s portraits manage to convey a hauntingly upfront and honest sentiment exposed through the layers.

Described as “inhuman and immaculate beings, as if the body is merely a storage for deep memories of pain, loss, and trauma” her subjects are simultaneously familiar and alien to us. Sharing unflinching moments of pain, the tears her figures shed don’t seem to indicate weakness, but rather a…

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Tattoos offer a high risk with a high reward—if you love a design, you’ll be delighted to wear it for the rest of your life. Bad body art, however, feels like the opposite—it makes you continually lament that it’s on your skin forever. Luckily, there’s no need to keep a tattoo that you hate. As seen in television shows like Tattoo Nightmares, it’s possible to cover up an old design and transform it into something that you’re proud to sport.

Some tattoo artists specialize in concealing old, bad, and embarrassing ink. Each has a unique story behind it, but they all have the same ending—the wearer wants the tattoo gone. But instead of costly removal, the offending image is inked over and absorbed into a brand new design. A great cover up hides any signs of the past tattoo.

Depending on the…

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Russian-born, UK-based artist Yulia Brodskaya has made an international name for herself as a gifted paper quilling genius. The artist has, arguably, single-handedly reintroduced the masses to a beautifully embellished art form, which dates back to the Renaissance, when French and Italian nuns and monks practiced quilling to create decorative religious objects.

Brodskaya’s portfolio of work has drawn our attention and endless admiration over the years. She’s honed her skill over time, constantly challenging herself to find new ways to practice quilling. Her subjects have ranged from typography to portraiture, each piece further accentuating her talent for the craft with her creative eye for color and texture.

The artist’s newest venture, a series known simply as Old People…

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King Kong has invaded New York while Marilyn Monroe makes a rare appearance at Las Vegas’ Neon Museum. Not really, of course, but cut paper artist Rich McCor imagines a world where they cleverly interact with the surrounding landscapes. Since we wrote about McCor’s work last year, he’s traveled to Europe and the UK, altering what he sees with simple shapes and black paper. “I've been fortunate enough to turn a hobby into a career of traveling the world,” McCor recently told us in an email, “and at the same time doing what I love to do—transforming landmarks with a sense of humor.”

McCor is now in the United States applying his iconic aesthetic to the East and West coast. Spider Man traverses…

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