A new museum has been opened as part of Shanghai's campaign to create 100 new museums in a decade. The Shanghai Glass Museum covers an impressive area of 53,800 square ft and includes a cafe, a library, DIY workshop area, permanent and temporary exhibition halls, and even a hot glass demonstration room. The museum is built from a former glass-making plant and incorporates much of the original architecture in the new design.

The museum brings in glass works from all eras as well as fields. From scientific glass instruments to contemporary glass sculptures, it leads visitors through both the history of glass and the evolution and use of it as both a practical and artistic medium. The use of various types of media along with the DIY workshops, make the museum visit an interactive experience as well as an educational one. All these works are beautifully highlighted with black glass cases that play with the lights and further highlight the intricacies of both the museum and the displayed works.

Architect Tilman Thurmer says about the museum concept that "Design wise, we wanted to create a piece of black crystal glass. Sparkling, reflecting, sleek and deep." The concept is carried out beautifully, not only on the inside, but the outside of the museum as well. Covered in enameled glass inscribed in ten different languages, each word highlights glass industry terminology.


















via [Adelto], [The Cool Hunter]

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Tags: Architecture, Shanghai, The Shanghai Glass Museum, Tilman Thurmer,

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Comment by sAm on September 29, 2011 at 1:01pm
Looks amazing, would love to visit this someday!
Comment by Daniel Fealko on September 28, 2011 at 4:37pm
Very impressive! If you'd like to visit the world's largest glass museum, then you should check out the Corning Museum of Glass in New York. It's definitely worth your time.
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