My Modern MetMy Modern Met Logo


Artist Joshua Suda paints portraits that look so amazingly realistic, it's hard to believe they're not photographs. From the texture of skin and the expressiveness of the subject's eyes, all the way to the subtle interplay of shadow and light on surfaces like hair and clothes, Suda absolutely nails it. His pieces truly embody the meaning of the word "hyperrealism."

Suda's flair for hyperrealism isn't just limited to the human subject, however. In many of his works, he paints layers of details that create interest and make the artwork's photographic appearance even more convincing. Ripped, scratched black-and-white photographs reveal human subjects underneath. A man's face emerges from a hole in a piece of paper. A hand rests upon a faded, sepia photo. Suda's use of color and his talent at recreating exact textures and lighting conditions make his paintings truly incredible.

According to the artist, he feels innately compelled to create; oil painting is just the medium through which he does that. He says, "I paint pictures. I've been born with an innate requirement to create, and by circumstance paint is the vehicle I have chosen. At the easel there is meditation, maybe some insanity that takes place. Sometimes I praise it, sometimes it's my scapegoat. It's a yin and yang thing going on. Whatever it is, there is a drive to get the cerebral into the physical without the ultimate concept ever fully unveiled; and that is why I paint."








Joshua Suda Website
via [Fubiz]

Email me when people comment –

You need to be a member of My Modern Met to add comments!

Join My Modern Met

Comments

  • Absolutely FANTASTIC!

This reply was deleted.

Subscribe to our mailing list